2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard (Annotated Bibliography Thirteen)

Concluding Thoughts. 23. Texas A&M Transportation Institute. Texas A&M Transportation Institute, Aug. 2015. Web. 28 Apr. 2016. <http://d2dtl5nnlpfr0r.cloudfront.net/tti.tamu.edu/documents/mobility-scorecard-2015.pdf>. This is report done by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute that discusses traffic congestion, what causes it, and what can be done to reduce it. In the report traffic congestion is described as a kind of tax that wastes the time and money of people. The report points to a number of contributory causes such as poor public transportation and lack of alternatives to...

The Atlanta Beltline’s Potential to Increase Racial Inequality

Jacob, Brown. “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline.” Emory University, 2013. Web. In his thesis “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline”,  Jacob Brown a student of the London School of Economics at Emory University, discusses the ” spatial dimensions of racial inequality” (3) that exist in Atlanta. In particular he examines the Beltline and “interrogates its broader potential to act as an agent of racial equity” (4). Brown notes that while the Beltline contributes green and art spaces and “connect Atlanta’s neighborhoods through multi-use trails and rail transit” (4) it can also have a “potential effect on Atlanta’s racial inequality” (4). Other projects such as the Olympic Park, Turner Field, Underground Atlanta and Omni International (5) claimed to solve issues similar to those addressed with the Beltline. However, these projects have all led to displaced impoverished black communities. Brown suggests because the Beltline shares characterisitcs of these projects and “how race affected these developments, and vice versa, indicates the Beltline’s potential relationship with racial equity” (7).  Northeast Beltline (Author’s Own) This source is useful for researchers because it shows how Atlanta’s environment is built to enhance disparities between  its “wealthy White north side”and “poor Black south side” and how this impact weakens social connections between neighborhoods. In the case of the Beltline the development appears to be beneficial providing “small businesses along the pedestrian trails, residential developments, art installations and parks” (10). However, this small improvement is overshadowed by inequalities. The Beltline rail is designed in a way that “divide neighborhoods and constrain intra-neighborhood connections” (16) leading to social exclusion due to lack of transportation. The purpose of this source is...

Interior Built Environment Description

Criminal Records is located off Euclid Avenue in Little Five Points. This Atlanta gem is not what it sounds like; the shop is not a boring office building that stores files on convicts. It is actually one of the only record shops left in the city, and in some people’s opinion, the one with the widest variety of products. Criminal Records sells an array of things: albums, CD’s, cassette tapes, books, comic books, posters, clothing, knick-knacks, and the list goes on. Not only is there so much to choose from, but also the space sets a certain mood that makes you want to spend hours searching. The structure of the space is set up similar to a maze. When entering the store the first thing that meets the eye are the rows and rows of albums and CD’s. Going down each aisle is like entering a new section of the maze, each one is different. The products are stored on shelves, in bins, boxes, and crates. So much musical history in one room, this shop is definitely an easy one to get “lost” in. Although this shop is a labyrinth of music and culture, the area is actually very spacious. It does not feel closed in or small. The aisles provide pathways to the back of the shop and it is easy to maneuver around. The lighting and colors have a lot to do with the mood of the store. Many of the walls are painted a pastel green color and the lighting is soft, which has to do with the large skylight windows located on the ceiling of...

Annotated Bibliography #6

“City Cafe: History of Little Five Points.” Atlanta’s NPR Station. Little Five Points: 90.1 FM WABE. Accessed February 26, 2016. http://news.wabe.org/post/city-cafe-history-little-five-points. This radio broadcast illustrates the fruitful history of Little Five Points; it is not just a “hippie” burrow of Atlanta, but a site with rich background that has shaped the built environment of the city. The author of a recent book about the area, “The Highs and Lows of Little Five: A History of Little Five Points”, spoke during the broadcast. Author, Robert Hartle Jr., spoke to the NPR host in the center of Little Five Points. He explains the evolution of the area, in that it thrived during the Great Depression, but began to sink during the 1950’s when schools integrated. Listeners can hear as Hartle points out landmarks, like the Corner Tavern, and elaborates on their history. The tavern was not just a place to drink and mingle, but also a meeting place where the community gathered and held discussions. The area is so much more than it looks, he explains, and has vast history for such a small burrow of the city. This broadcast provides an aural source for people to learn more about Little Five Points. There may be some bias because the author has written a book about the area, so he is clearly passionate about it. Hartle only mentions the upside to Little Five Points. Generally, this source fits in well with my other sources and provided me with new facts about the...
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