Built Environment Analysis: Buckhead vs. Little 5 Points

I was walking by Little 5 Points to get to Aurora Coffee Shop one afternoon. I was wearing some ripped jeans, a flannel, and my favorite Vans. I walked into Aurora and not one head turned. I got my tea from there and I left. I went to Buckhead right after to go to Lenox Mall. Once I started walking toward the mall through the parking lot, I noticed a lot of people staring at me; a lot of men and women in suits and business attire. It hit me instantly. Buckhead and Little 5 Points have different expectations. Buckhead and Little 5 Points are very different in regards to the urban design theory, how they are designed and built, who they attract, and what their purpose is. Buckhead has a very interesting background to how it became “Buckhead”. This is important because it gives a sense of why it is the way it is. In 1838 a man named Henry Irby purchased some land near the intersection of what is now Peachtree, Roswell, and Wes Paces Ferry Road. On this land, he built a tavern and grocery store. Once these were built, a community as born. The city got its name from a story that says Irby killed a buck and hung the head in his tavern. The area started out as a prime place for summer and country homes for Atlanta’s wealthiest people. Many of the large estates were sold off, allowing for some of the most famous and prestigious commercial development in the southeastern portion of the United States. The modern design of Buckhead came about...

Built Environment Analysis: Buckhead vs. Little 5 Points

Intro: I was walking by Little 5 Points to get to Aurora Coffee Shop one afternoon. I was wearing some ripped jeans, a flannel, and my favorite Vans. I walked into Aurora and not one head turned. I got my tea from there and I left. I went to Buckhead right after to go to Lenox Mall. Once I started walking toward the mall through the parking lot, I noticed a lot of people staring at me; a lot of men and women in suits and business attire. It hit me instantly. Buckhead and Little 5 Points have different expectations. Thesis/claim: Buckhead and Little 5 Points are very different in regards to how they are designed and built, who they attract, and what their purpose is. Buckhead History behind Buckhead Henry Irby 1838, built a tavern and grocery store Got its name from a story that says Irby killed a buck and hung the head in his tavern Started out as a prime place for summer and country homes for Atlanta’s wealthiest Many of the large estates were sold off, allowing for some of the most famous and prestigious commercial development in the southeastern portion of the United States Modern Design Today, Buckhead real estate development milestones include Lenox Square built in 1959, which is the largest shopping center in the southeast. Phipps Plaza, another luxurious shopping center built soon after Lenox. In 1974, Tower Place was built and paved the way for future high-rises in Buckhead. Then in 1984, the flagship Ritz Carlton was built, which helped lead the Buckhead community further in deluxe accommodations and luxury. Who...

Annotated Bibliographies #1-#10

Annotated Bibliography #1 Carmona, Matthew. “The Place-Shaping Continuum: A Theory Of Urban Design Process.” Journal Of Urban Design 19.1 (2014): 2-36. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. This article discusses Urban Design. It begins by discussing urban design as a subject for investigation. This article focuses on London. It has a section called “Understanding Urban Design Process”. This section relates to the built environment in Atlanta because it goes into detail to discuss and understand Urban Design and how it is undertaken in different places, big or small. The next section discusses how urban design is situation in both place and time. How we act today is shaped by history of experience and practice. The urban design process starts before developmental proposals and these build up over a long period of time that causes changes all the way up to the present. It then gets into the actual process of urban design: designing, developing, using, and managing. This article is very detailed and well explained which is why I chose this source. There are a few terms and ideas in this article that are not defined which makes it a little difficult at times to understand exactly what the main point is. This source is scholarly making it a little difficult to read, but very informative and useful. Annotated Bibliography #2 Inam, Aseem. “From Dichotomy to Dialectic: Practicing Theory in Urban Design.” Journal of Urban Design 16.2 (2011): 257-277. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. This article discusses dichotomy in practicing urban design. This article helps to address the assumption that theory and practice do not necessarily...

Passage Responses: Schindler’s “Architectural Exclusion”

1. Urban Design is exactly what it sounds like: the layout and architectural from the lines on the street to the top of the skyscrapers in an Urban, city-like location. Visually, Urban Design can look like what a Georgia State student sees when they walk to and fro from the numerous and fluctuating in architectural stylistics buildings that Georgia State owns. We at GSU are surrounded and immersed in Urban Design. 4. A lot of times people barely recognize the implications behind architecture or urban design, much less are cognizant of the exclusionary nature behind it. Something as simple as a park bench with bars separating 3 seats could be viewed as such (more than likely by people who live in the community or are privileged). However, for a homeless person, those bars, bar them from being able to sleep on the benches. 7. Architecture designs are all created with purpose. The phrase “there are no neutral designs” is in concurrence with that. All architecture has rhetoric, it simply communicates to different people different things- especially within different socioeconomic statuses. 14. It is very common to see African Americans (or POC in general)  living in urban or metropolitan communities and Caucasians residing in suburban areas because of the stratification in cost of living. This fact, and the fact that many minorities living in the inner city either cannot afford or have no need to possess private transit such as a car. Therefore public transit is very common and heavily used. Although minorities have access to transit suburban towns have blocked this transit from reaching their towns- keeping minorities and...

Annotated Bibliography #3

Ellis, Cliff. “Process And Principles In Urban Design.” Journal Of Urban Design 19.1 (2014): 47-48. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. This article is a response to the first article I used. Ellis portrays the article in a good way. He discusses his support but also his opinion. He says, “No doubt, process is critical. But I hope that urban designers will continue the quest for processes that will actually produce beautiful, functional and humane landscapes” (Ellis 47). The information in this article helps to explain some of the concepts brought about in Carmona’s article, and it discusses that planning should be done in order to find the one that works. This relates to the built environment in Atlanta because everything has to be planned carefully. I chose this source because it was a follow up to an article I had already read. I think that the only flaw of this article is the bias Ellis has. He states his opinions rather than just concrete facts. This article offers an alternative viewpoint to Carmona’s article but also provides more in depth explanation of a few...
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