The Atlanta Beltline’s Potential to Increase Racial Inequality

Jacob, Brown. “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline.” Emory University, 2013. Web. In his thesis “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline”,  Jacob Brown a student of the London School of Economics at Emory University, discusses the ” spatial dimensions of racial inequality” (3) that exist in Atlanta. In particular he examines the Beltline and “interrogates its broader potential to act as an agent of racial equity” (4). Brown notes that while the Beltline contributes green and art spaces and “connect Atlanta’s neighborhoods through multi-use trails and rail transit” (4) it can also have a “potential effect on Atlanta’s racial inequality” (4). Other projects such as the Olympic Park, Turner Field, Underground Atlanta and Omni International (5) claimed to solve issues similar to those addressed with the Beltline. However, these projects have all led to displaced impoverished black communities. Brown suggests because the Beltline shares characterisitcs of these projects and “how race affected these developments, and vice versa, indicates the Beltline’s potential relationship with racial equity” (7).  Northeast Beltline (Author’s Own) This source is useful for researchers because it shows how Atlanta’s environment is built to enhance disparities between  its “wealthy White north side”and “poor Black south side” and how this impact weakens social connections between neighborhoods. In the case of the Beltline the development appears to be beneficial providing “small businesses along the pedestrian trails, residential developments, art installations and parks” (10). However, this small improvement is overshadowed by inequalities. The Beltline rail is designed in a way that “divide neighborhoods and constrain intra-neighborhood connections” (16) leading to social exclusion due to lack of transportation. The purpose of this source is...

Annotated Bibliography of Joseph T. Geller and Robert M. Corning’s “Designing a Unified Campus”

An example of a campus Geller, Joseph T., and Robert M. Corning. “Designing a Unified Campus.”University Business Magazine. N.p., 2007. Web. 14 Feb. 2016. Geller and Corning feet that a “character of a campus whether it truly has that storybook look and feel can be a critical differentiator in the final decision” in whether a family wants to allow their child to attend the college ( Geller and Corning par. 2). Examples like “gateways, signs, and other visual cues like plantings and lighting” are “critical contributors to identity, creating important initial impressions” ( Geller and Corning par. 5). A “Master’s Plan” was initiated with multiple steps to achieve “that true campus feeling.” After the master plan, a “design firm” come in play to map out the visuals of the campus. The purpose of this article is to encourage campuses to reconsider their look of their landscape so they can attract more students. The intended audience are designers for campuses and colleges who have campuses. This article is useful because it gives insight that colleges use their landscape as another source of advertisement and i’m able to be more aware of their...
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