“All Together Now” – The Beatles

Reading Summary #5: Emily Bazelon – “Making Bathrooms More Accommodating” Historically, the world has always been a place that has been tailored to accommodating the male gender. We were simply put here to work, make money, and have a woman to support us in almost every other aspect of life. Now, more than ever, this is changing drastically. Woman, finally, have equal rights, and are on the verge of being treated exactly the same way as men always have been. The article by Emily Bazelon takes this a bit further and introduces our necessity to treat men, woman, AND non-gender identifying individuals the same way, in particular accommodating then in their needs of acceptance in the bathroom and other physical areas that are historically looked upon with no sort of grey area. This article begins by noting that bathroom signage is the clearest visual marker of sexual difference. It is slowly being accepted to allow girls who identify as male to join male teams but allowing them in the male bathroom is another entirely different issue at hand (Bazelon lines 21-25). The main word used in this clear and apparent act of separation is “accommodation”. It stems from our early stages of civil rights movements, to allow African Americans to sit anywhere they please on a bus or use any water fountain/bathroom they deserve.   I believe the strongest statement made in this article is by, Mara Keisling, Co-Founder and Director of the national Center for Transgender Equality, and she summarizes her point that in order to have a civil society, it must start with accommodation. This was immediately...

Bathroom Accommodation in Atlanta By: Shayla Nash

I. Public Bathroom Accommodation: Transgender people fight for their bathroom rights II. Transgender a term used to describe people who’s gender identity differ from their sex. Transgender people have had to struggle very hard for their basic rights to be accepted by society and are still fighting. Now Transgender people are fighting for their rights to use the bathroom of the sex they identify as. III. A trangender person is effected by by this behavior. Example Architectural exclusion: Discrimination and segregation through Physical Design Of The Built Environment  by Shcindlar. Schindler talks about the way our environments affects our behavior, how we interact with other around us. IV. When using public facilities there is always a risk factor. Some people fear that people will take advantage of transgender people using the bathroom mostly men. However people can be at risk of people of the same gender wither its sexual abuse or an aim to humiliate another. Who’s to say the girl next to you isn’t peeping at you this applies to guys as well. The only way to decrease this risk is to not use public bathrooms. If someone tries to use this situation to assault or take advantage of another person, then this person obviously doesn’t respect the laws that protect citizens and will seek situation to cause harm to another anyway. They will be punished by our laws but we can’t punish transgender citizens as well not for other people’s...

Reading Summaries 3 & 4

Tick, Suzanne. “His & Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society.” Metropolis Magazine. Mar. 2015. Web. 06 Feb. 2016. Writer Suzanne Trick gives her realtors insight on how “gender-neutral design” is bound to become the next big thing in the workplace. We don’t initially pay attention that how offices are normally designed from men. We are so accustomed to the masculine theme of workplaces because of men’s power roles throughout history. The males’ needs were deemed as the most important, so the design of the workspaces had been catered to their needs. There is an apparent new wave of feminism. With help from Emma Watson and the LGBTQ community, there has become a more gradual acceptance of unisex spaces. “In the workplace, the barriers in hierarchies have started to come down as women have become more prominent.” Designers have started incorporating “gender sensitivity “into the spaces that they’re designing. Because of the growing trend of the obscuring of gender roles the accommodation for those in transgender communities and androgynists has become more necessary. In the workplace, bathrooms have become the main focus of this new trend that we’ve been discussing. Some coworkers aren’t comfortable with sharing a restroom with a transgender coworker. Now the concern becomes how can restrooms in the workplace accommodate all genders while respecting each individual’s needs. Bazelon, Emily. “Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 21 Nov. 2015. Web. 06 Feb. 2016. In this article Emily Bazelon points out that the word “accommodate” is often used when discussing bathroom access and can be both welcoming and hospitable, and compulsive. It has...

Annotated Bibliography #6

Kopas, Matthew Bryon David. “The Illogic of Separation: Examining Arguments About Gender-Neutral Public Bathrooms.” Thesis. N.p., 2012. digital.lib.washington.edu. Web. 23 Feb. 2016. This study examines how people who are generally unfamiliar with the debate surrounding gender equality with regards to bathrooms and the idea of a gender neutral restroom. It analyzed the different counter-arguments people presenting in their resistance to this new built environment, with the only argument left unaddressed being the argument that cited religious beliefs for the attachment to gender binary bathrooms. This study is relevant to the content of this class discussed in the session during which we analyzed the assigned reading about ending gender segregation in bathrooms. It relates to the built environment of Atlanta because while Atlanta is a relatively progressive community, it is still within the Bible Belt and religious beliefs still play a large part in how policy and law makers go about doing their jobs (as evidenced by the recent House Bill 575 and the rhetoric of Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, including phrases like “God’s country”). This article is likely intended for the proponents of policy that would require gender neutral bathrooms so that they can better understand the arguments of those who seek to oppose these...

AB: South Dakota Ban on Transgender Students

(https://twitter.com/hollyyancnn) (http://fellowshipoftheminds.com) Holly Yan, a reporter/writer/editor for CNN Digital, wrote the article titled “South Dakota Could be First State to Ban Transgender Students in Some Restrooms” focusing on a bill South Dakota is trying to get passed forcing transgender students to use the restroom of their biological gender rather than the one they identify with. This bill was put in motion in order to ” protect the physical privacy of students from having to expose themselves, or be exposed to others, when in a state of undress or nakedness while at school or school functions,” according the bill’s author State Representative Fred Deutsch. “The state Senate passed the bill Tuesday, February 16,  in a 20-15 vote, after the state House approved it 58-10 last month. The measure now goes to Republican Gov. Dennis Daugaard’s desk.” This news article is useful for anyone needing an example when doing research on architectural discrimination or the exclusion of the transgender community in 2016.  ...
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