Public Transportation Expansion For Georgia’s Tourists

A famous man by the name of Herschel Walker once said, “Coming from a small town it was tough to dream big. When I grew up in a small town in Georgia, my biggest dream was one day to be able to go to Atlanta.” It is evident that people not only across the United States, but across the world share Herschel Walker’s dream of coming to Atlanta. According to (Hartsfield), Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has been the world’s busiest airport since 1998. This goes to say that Atlanta’s beauty and view points bring in tourists from across the globe. With all of the beauty that Atlanta has to offer, tourists need a way to navigate throughout the city. The Atlanta Street Car and MARTA’s train system give tourists an easy way to navigate throughout Atlanta, but unlike other major cities in the United States, this public transportation systems lack of expansion leaves tourists with inconvenient ways of traveling to other historic landmarks across Georgia. Some of these historic landmarks that tourists may struggle attend include; Stone Mountain, Six Flags over Georgia, and Lake Lanier Islands. Stone Mountain, which is located in Dekalb County is a popular landmark in the state of Georgia. According to (David), Native Americans were the first humans to visit and explore Stone Mountain 9,000 years ago.  Native American tribes used Stone Mountain as an important meeting place where they discussed plans on how to avoid the diseases that the Europeans carried. Around 1847, white settles began to populate the mountain and eventually gave it the name Stone Mountain.  To go along with Stone Mountain’s ancient...

The Diamond Among the Rubble: Stone Mountain

“Ethereal. Invigorating. Peaceful.” These are the three words that describe the undeniable charm Stone Mountain possesses. Founded as a state park in 1958, Stone Mountain resides next to the buzzing and noisy highway 78, and acts as a quiet sanctuary away from the chaos of civilization. My adventure started at the entrance where I had the option of paying for a daily pass or using a seasonal pass for parking. Being a person who regularly comes to Stone Mountain, I had a seasonal pass and was able to breeze through the entrance. Immediately, I was surrounded on all sides by the brown of the trees, the green grass and the dull and murky blue lakes. As you dwell farther into the park, signs point in multiple directions, directing people to the locations of exhibits and attractions. The first location I entered was the strategically placed Crossroads. The Crossroads is placed in a location that is likely to be passed, regardless of where you wish to go in the park and is surrounded by signs and advertisements directing people into it. This is because the Crossroads is the transportation hub of Stone Mountain and serves as a staring point for newcomers and tourists. Almost all tickets for attractions must be bought in the Crossroads, and it is also where most of the children oriented activities are located. In addition to this, the Memorial Hall Museum sits right next to the Crossroads and is oriented for a older audience. Coincidence? I do not think so. The Crossroads. Take note of the signs and advertisements. Grist Mill However, this is the only place...

Exterior Environment #4: Carillon

http://sites.gsu.edu/etalundzic2/files/2016/02/output56bbf1251875a-v8u9vn.mp4 This video shows the beautiful Carillon at Stone Mountain. I arrived during the daily concert that is performed by Mabel Sharp, and has been for over 30 years now. However, the day that I arrived, it was playing the recording since live performances only take place over the weekends. The Carillon, just like the Grist Mill, was not originally built at Stone Mountain. The Carillon was donated by Coca-Cola after it was shown in the 1964 World’s...

Exterior Environment #6: Entrance to Walk-up Trail

This is the entrance to the Walk-up Trail at Stone Mountain. From this point to the top, the trail length is 1.1 miles and is a combination of steep and gentle slopes. Pets are not allowed to go on the walk-up trail and the trail itself is surrounded in warning signs to not stray off the designated trail. Once a higher elevation is reached, the trail becomes surrounded in fencing to prevent people from going on the dangerously steep parts of the...

Exterior Environment #3: Grist Mill

Welcome to the Grist Mill. This spot serves as a place for people to come and host cook outs, let their children play in the water before the mill and lake and take pictures. The Grist Mill itself was not built in Stone Mountain, but was moved from its original spot in Ellijay, Georgia. Access is strictly forbidden into the mill and it is padlocked shut. Video:...
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