Summarization of Emily Bazelon’s ‘Making Bathrooms More ‘Accomodating’

Emily Bazelon’s article, ‘Making Bathrooms More Accommodating’, unmasks the fore-judged entanglement of “accommodation” concerning restrooms. Generally, males and females thoughtlessly restrict themselves to entering spaces designed specifically for their particular sex: “Men on one door, WOMEN on the the other (Bazelon par. 1).” However, transgender people challenge our initial cognitive law that prohibits genders to interchangeably enter restrooms without being frowned upon. google depiction of women v. women leaving transgender people as a non factor In the beginning of the article, Bazelon states the fashion, form, and manner fixated in society’s view of bathrooms in which claims that bathrooms are a safe haven that separates men and women. Women and men accept that bathrooms were designed for their best fit which separates the sexes. Although, this idea excludes transgender people and causes them to be dismissed in places they feel they belong. Bazelon’s example, reveals the story of “a transgender high school student that was refused the right to change in the girls’ locker room even with her passport identifying her as a female.(Bazelon PAR. 4) Instances such as these raise inquiry among the community forcing change to be put forth. google depiction of gender equality Consequently, accommodation for transgender people must takes place. Bazelon describes accommodation best as “a word that involves moving over to make room for other people, whether you want it or not(PAR 5).” With social standards prohibiting transgender people from public bathrooms, the transgender people are limited single stall bathrooms which aren’t always available. So the question rose is society really accommodating or are the “transgender people doing all the accommodating(PAR 7).” At the end of...

Annotated Bib #9: “Women in tech: Scarcity, Sexism, and Solutions”

Jen Heilemann. “Women in Tech:Scarcity, Sexism, and Solutions.” The storyexchange. N.p., 9 Apr. 2013. Web. Jen Heilemann is a Developer at The Nerdery, which is a company for custom software design and development. Helieman feels “female participation in Computer Science and particularly programming conferences is pitiful” and she offers a link to a number of statistics that support her idea. These links lead to credible sources. She states that “in 1987, 42% of software developers in the US were women, while today, that number hovers around 28%.” “Today” is reference to the year 2013, the reader could question whether these numbers are still active. The author then talks about how the number of female participants in the industry varies and leads to the “Steve Rule”, blatantly stating there would be greater number of men named “Steve” than female participants. It is said that culture has a lot to do with this, because according to society men and women are suppose to assume a certain role. In the end the author offers incidents to support the claim of sex-based discrimination and she offers some solutions. This source is useful. It offers good detail and the author offers links in order to support her claims. The article was published in 2013, so some of the information may have updated. I feel this article is very useful looking to discover the effects of gender on digital...

Sexism and Graphic Design: Annotated Bib

Retrieved from Zbrastudios.com “Where Are The Female Designers?” Attitude Design. N.p., 19 Nov. 2007. Web.    The UK based designer team Attitude Designers, conducted a small survey composed of four female “notable web designers” to shed a little bit of light on this question: “Why is it that females don’t seem to be as prominent in web design as they are in say fashion design?” (paragraph two).    The names of the four professionals are , Tanya Merone, Rina Miele , Veerle Pieters, and Larissa Meek . Here are a few example of the questions that were asked during the survey. One question read, “Do you think there are less female designers than male? If so why do you think this is?”(paragraph four). Meek answers, “I know without a doubt that there are less designers in the interactive medium….. many women are creative but the technical fears of computers can seem intimidating”.     Another question read, “Do you have any examples of sexism you have personally had to suffer- with clients of with the industry?”(paragraph nine). Miele answers, “Being taken serious is an issue and men accepting women as professionals and that they’re fully capable as men is also an issue iv’e faced”. On a scale from one to useful I would rate 100 percent useful. This survey gives first hand accounts from four well-known female web designers about their experience in this field. Persons doing research on web design and sexism may find this very useful, researchers interested in the build environment of the web design industry can also use this, and this may even be useful to some interested in...

Better Online Living: Melissa King Reading Summary

UC Santa Cruz graduate Melissa King constructs an article discussing the importance of media content control and why opposers believe that the control isn’t necessary. Cruz states “Nobody should be required to read or listen to content if they don’t want to” (paragraph one). Retrieved from contentmarketinginstitute.com She first gives examples content control features such as “block and ignore functions”,”privacy options”, and “content/trigger warnings”. She later provides a claim that these functions are vital in preventing internet harassment, which can later lead to “PTSD”: post traumatic stress disorder. However, opposers of content control claim that the users of this these tools are “too sensitive”. King then provides an argument by Caleb Lack, “a licensed clinical psychologist and psychology professor who specializes in treating anxiety disorders”, that counteracts the opposing arguemnt. He states “I think it’s relatively safe to say that you can get PTSD from twitter, due to the knowledge about cyber bullying and PTSD” (paragraph 5). King then goes on to explain how “women who tread in male dominated areas suffer from intimidation tactics” the most. For example, women in the “tech industry” and in “video game culture” are subject to these harassments. She also explains that the majority or content control are “individuals who are not regular targets of digital abuse” (paragraph 12). Lastly she she makes a final statement on why content control is essential. ” Content control gives people more room to act on behalf of their own mental and emotional needs” (paragraph...
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