Built Environment Analysis- Segregation is Not Over

Madison Brooks Dr. Robin Wharton Engl 1102 20 April 2016 Segregation is Not Over As Atlanta, Georgia made steps to recover after World War II, African Americans were treated as second-class citizens by Caucasians as commercial expansion uprooted their homes and inner city development was used to push them out of the city and into the suburbs. As a result, African Americans and Caucasians began and continue to settle in separate communities. African Americans and Caucasians live segregated mainly because Caucasians physically forced African Americans out of their existing homes and into the suburbs. After World War II, programs intended for reconstruction wound up only benefiting wealthy, politically powerful men (Bullard 12). These men were uninterested in improving areas of deteriorating poverty in the city. Federal programs such as anti-poverty projects were gradually ignored, and as a result failed miserably. For example, Atlanta begun the Model Cities Program in 1966 in an effort to fix the problems in Atlanta’s low-income neighborhoods, which were mostly inhabited by African Americans (Holliman 21). The program was substantially underfunded and understaffed and did little for the living conditions of the select neighborhoods. Instead of finding other ways to improve these lower-class areas, politicians’ solutions were to simply destroy these “slums” and create new developments over them in the race to expand Atlanta into a tourist destination (Holliman 21). As well as African American families forced out of their homes, the larger activity in private development compared to federal government programs, caused Caucasians to steadily drive an increasing gap between the social classes of Caucasians and African Americans (Pooley). In the 20th century, in addition...

AB: The Building Blocks of Atlanta: Racial Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Inequity

Hayes, Melissa Mae, “The Building Blocks of Atlanta: Racial Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Inequity.” Thesis, Georgia State University, 2006. Using the Census 2000 block group data, Melissa Hayes examines “racial residential segregation in the five core counties of Atlanta.” This study was conducted in order to prove that residential segregation has a direct correlation with discrimination and the inequalities suffered by minorities in the 21st century. Atlanta Region Race & Ethnicity Changes, 2000-2010 This article is useful for anyone needing a reliable source dealing with racial statistics and segregation in the 21st century. Within this article Hayes makes the direct correlation between class and race pointing out the difference in education opportunities and just all around community preservation. Throughout the article is a variety of comparisons of the traditional white neighborhood versus the traditional black neighborhood. Rich V.S Poor (Color Line) Hayes also goes on to say, “During the first half of the twentieth century, white Americans, through the denial of access to housing markets in metropolitan areas, created the black urban ghetto (Massey and Denton 1993).” Thus creating the color line and keeping it going from generation to generation. This information can be used in an article addressing the impact historical events still have on society today. Other interesting facts include how bank lenders made it difficult for African Americans to leave the ghetto because they will not do business with them. Just the same real estate agents demand “unreasonably inflated interests rates“ requiring higher down payments in order for African Americans to even consider leaving the ghetto. This is a great resource to use on legal racial...

Atlanta Built Environment Project: Race and Segregation

Claim #1: Overall, Atlanta’s exterior built environment encourages and sustains racism in the city. 1.1   http://sites.gsu.edu/koglesby6/2016/02/24/annotated-bibliography-4-displacement-and-the-racial-state-in-olympic-atlanta-1990-1996-by-seth-gustafson/ http://sites.gsu.edu/sberry11/2016/02/18/annotated-bib-6-sweet-auburn-market/ http://sites.gsu.edu/hhenry2/2016/03/05/decatur-marta-station-artifact-2/ 1.2   SCHINDLER, SARAH. “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination And Segregation Through Physical Design Of The Built Environment.” Yale Law Journal 124.6 (2015): 1934-2024. Academic Search Complete. Web. Hankins, Katherine B., Robert Cochran, and Kate Driscoll Derickson. “Making Space, Making Race: Reconstituting White Privilege In Buckhead, Atlanta.” Social & Cultural Geography 13.4 (2012): 379-397. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14649365.2012.688851#.VuOnUJwrLIU Even noting the titles of the articles you will see the clear racial elements that must be discussed in each of them. With keywords such as “discrimination”, “segregation”, and “white privilege” a connotation of race relations is present due to the society we live in- The United States of America where race relations and themes of binary racial tensions specifically between Blacks and Whites is a fundamental part of our social makeup now and in history.  Architectural Exclusion by Sarah Schindler illuminates the ways built environments and certain spaces promote racial inequities, while Making Space, Making Race: Reconstituting White Privilege In Buckhead, Atlanta  highlights the after effects of this institutionalized racial divide. 1.3 <http://www.governing.com/gov-data/gentrification-in-cities-governing-report.html>. This popular source article explains and provides a good amount of statistical data on Gentrification. Gentrification is the relocation of inhabitants and rebuilding of an area, in such a way that property value is increased. Because of the fact that caucasians on average make up the greatest percent of those in the economical upper and middle class tiers, gentrification subsequently is a form of racism and segregation. The statistical information in the article provides good ethos.   1.4   Bibliography http://www.governing.com/gov-data/gentrification-in-cities-governing-report.html http://sites.gsu.edu/hhenry2/2016/03/05/decatur-marta-station-artifact-2/ http://sites.gsu.edu/koglesby6/2016/02/24/annotated-bibliography-4-displacement-and-the-racial-state-in-olympic-atlanta-1990-1996-by-seth-gustafson/ http://sites.gsu.edu/sberry11/2016/02/18/annotated-bib-6-sweet-auburn-market/ SCHINDLER,...
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