Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments

In her essay “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments”, Mary E. Hocks discusses how digital environments are designed with features like “audience stance, transparency, and hybridity” (629). The ” visual and interactive nature of native hypertext and multimedia writing” (629) makes it difficult for scholars to distinguish words from visuals, as Hocks suggests “Interactive digital texts can blend words and visuals  talk and text, and authors and audiences in ways that are recognizably postmodern (630). She references ” Gary Heba’s delineation of how html authoring mirrors rhetorical processes for composition” (630) and ” Patricia Sullivan’s arguments that expand our definitions of electronic writing to include graphics, screen design, and other media form” (630). The work of early professionals in “technical communication” that “demonstrated how rhetorical decisions impact the visual design of an online document or system” (630) alerted scholars  to think about the visual aspect of writing. Anne Wysocki stated that “computer-based interactive media can now blend text and images so thoroughly that they are indistinguishable on the screen (2010)” (630). These arguments have convinced teachers to redefine what we consider to be  writing. Hocks introduces the idea of interpreting new media as “hybrid forms” . As students we “look at artifacts such as online games or Web sites” (630) and we make  “assumptions about gender, age, nationality, or other identity categories” (630). Hocks states that all writing is hybrid that “it is at once verbal, spatial, and visual.” (631).  As interactive digital media has become a part of college writing courses, writing is now  “internetworked writing”-writing that involves the intertwining of production, interaction, and publication in the online classroom or professional workplace...

Bibliographic Annotation 4 and 5

Bibliographic Annotation #4: Where It All Went Wrong Monroe, Doug. “Where It All Went Wrong.” Atlanta 52.4 (2012): 86-98. Master FILE. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. This article is a concise article that takes you through a vision of MARTA from its early creation, struggles it had with funding and to where it is now is at. The article gives great insight into the struggles the lack of a proper public transit system is doing for Atlanta as a city. For example, on page 96, Christopher B. Leinberger, a professor at Georgetown who has watched Atlanta rise and fall, clearly states that our cities biggest failure was not allowing the public transit to thrive within the limits and perpetually connect our city. This article was completely valid to the topic of rhetoric in the built environment; because it demonstrates the struggles Atlanta has with its inability to attract a new workforce due to our mediocre transit system.  I have found no flaws in this article; it connects our lack of a proper built environment and even connects the dots on the racial struggles that the city faced while the development of our public transit system. I believe it could have been more relevant, since it is nearly 4 years old and we have been pushing leaps and bounds since then to advance our system, but the information provided was a direct link to the struggles Atlanta’s Public transit has on connecting users from throughout the state in a cohesive manner.   Bibliographic Annotation #5: “Making Marta… Cool?” Burns, Rebecca. “Making Marta… Cool?” Atlanta 54.10 (2015): 17-20. MasterFILE Elite. Web. 19...

Passage Responses: Schindler’s “Architectural Exclusion”

1. Urban Design is exactly what it sounds like: the layout and architectural from the lines on the street to the top of the skyscrapers in an Urban, city-like location. Visually, Urban Design can look like what a Georgia State student sees when they walk to and fro from the numerous and fluctuating in architectural stylistics buildings that Georgia State owns. We at GSU are surrounded and immersed in Urban Design. 4. A lot of times people barely recognize the implications behind architecture or urban design, much less are cognizant of the exclusionary nature behind it. Something as simple as a park bench with bars separating 3 seats could be viewed as such (more than likely by people who live in the community or are privileged). However, for a homeless person, those bars, bar them from being able to sleep on the benches. 7. Architecture designs are all created with purpose. The phrase “there are no neutral designs” is in concurrence with that. All architecture has rhetoric, it simply communicates to different people different things- especially within different socioeconomic statuses. 14. It is very common to see African Americans (or POC in general)  living in urban or metropolitan communities and Caucasians residing in suburban areas because of the stratification in cost of living. This fact, and the fact that many minorities living in the inner city either cannot afford or have no need to possess private transit such as a car. Therefore public transit is very common and heavily used. Although minorities have access to transit suburban towns have blocked this transit from reaching their towns- keeping minorities and...

Oakland Cemetery

Oakland Cemetery, built in 1850 and located in the heart of Cabbagetown Town in Atlanta, GA, is as serene and tranquil as one might imagine a cemetery to be. In contrast the MARTA trains screeching halts in the distance and the hustle and bustle of busy streets and livelihood parallel to the grounds you enter an ethereal realm in which removes you from this life. Walking the grounds was much like a walk through a museum, sections dedicated to lost lives of different eras, but also specific to race, class, and religion. Footsteps click against the stone paths, some cracked while other give way to dirt paths and asphalt roads all the while leading you to a new part of the cemetery. Clearly divided peoples lie beneath the Earth as you follow the paths, made noticeable by new markings on gravestones, proximity of the markers  from one another, or certain land markings (perhaps a flag for example). The sound of passing cars blend in with the sound of the wind rustling the dead leaves left behind by an abundance of now naked trees. The colors have faded to neutrals. Yellows, oranges, reds, stained greys of the concrete tombstones set against a clear blue sky. The Atlanta skyline in the distance, with towering buildings and the subconscious knowledge that there are hundreds of thousands of people in the area surrounding, in sharp comparison to some of small unassuming gravestones of the dead and lives forgotten. Benches spread throughout the grounds, welcoming life to take a break for just a moment. A greenhouse located on the far side of the cemetery being...
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