“Tapestry Of Space: Domestic Architecture And Underground Communities In Margaret Morton’s Photography Of A Forgotten New York.”

Bernard “Homelessness is not truly the condition of not having a home.” This one statement was the foundation of Margaret Morton’s photographic documentary. Morton explored the “unappealing” tunnels and Burroughs of New York to showcase the beauties of these seemingly dangerous and forgotten, places in the city. Her initial objective was to show the connection between the homeless and the communities of homes that they have made on their own, along with their sense of stability. “By taking a city that is a site for mass marketing and depicting communities that have been pushed out of the consumer image of New York and out of adequate New York life itself, she proves that spectacles take place at public expense.”(Nersessova) Morton invites us into the lives of  people we see as  inferior and sometimes dangerous,  forgetting that they too are humans. Hector A, Bushville, 1991 “Because shelter is an essential part of sustaining oneself, identity is closely tied to one’s place of home, and because no place is guaranteed to be a permanent home, this aspect of identity is consistently fragile.”(Nersessova) Having a home and your sense of identity are both so universal and fragile. The only difference between those who aren’t recognized as homeless and those who are, is that  homeless people the vulnerability of homess people are more apparent. Homeless individuals are thought to be the ones having unstable identities. This couldn’t be any further from the truth. Through Morton’s photogrpahic presentation, we see the creations of dwellings from practically nothing; old clothes, bedding, scraps of metals, and tools that we throw out on a daily basis. These areas...
css.php