Final Draft Built Environment Analysis: Communal Differences: Virginia-Highlands v. Little Five Points

Communal Differences: Virginia-Highlands v. Little Five Points While strolling down the stained sidewalks of Little Five Points, drum beats played on turned over buckets pulse through the streets, the smell of street food fills the air, and an array of people explore the eclectic retail district. On the contrary, on the streets of Virginia Highlands there is a certain stillness. Other than the sound of cars passing by, the area has peacefulness to it. The restaurants are more uniform and so is the community. Surrounding the shops and restaurants are suburban homes with front porch swings and minivans. These two areas are in close proximity, but differ greatly. The built environments of Little Five Points and Virginia Highlands shape and are shaped by different groups of people due to differences in the historical foundation of the spaces, the layout of the streets, and the location of these neighborhoods in proximity to other influential spaces in Atlanta. Historical Foundation An area’s historical background influences how the built environment of that space develops as time progresses. Since the late 1960’s, Little Five Points has been known for its odd knick-knack shops, antiques, and discount clothing (Wheatley). Even back then people knew they could go to Little Five Points to save money on picture shows, clothing, and other goods. It is interesting to see how that trend has stayed with and developed the area over the last fifty years. Because the neighborhood’s roots are deep into the eclectic culture of city living and freedom of expression, the area has not developed into anything more than just that. Because it has been “known for” a certain type...

SECOND DRAFT: Communal Differences: Virginia-Highlands v. Little Five Points (Built Environment Analysis)

While strolling down the stained sidewalks of Little Five Points, drum beats played on turned over buckets pulse through the streets, the smell of street food fills the air, and an array of people explore the funky shops. On the contrary, on the streets of Virginia Highlands there is certain stillness. Other than the sound of cars zooming by, the area has peacefulness to it. The restaurants are more uniform and so are the people. Surrounding the shops and restaurants are suburban homes with front porch swings and minivans. These two areas are in close proximity, but differ greatly. The built environments of Little Five Points and Virginia Highlands shape and are shaped by different groups of people due to differences in the historical foundation of the spaces, the layout of the streets, and the location of these neighborhoods in proximity to other influential spaces in Atlanta. Historical Foundation An area’s historical background influences how the built environment of that space develops as time goes on. Since the late 1960’s Little Five Points has been known for its odd knick-knack shops, antiques, and discount clothing (Wheatley). Even back then people knew they could go to Little Five Points to save money on movie theaters, clothing, and other goods. It is interesting to see how that trend has stayed with and developed the area over the last fifty years. Because the neighborhood’s roots are deep into the eclectic culture of city living and freedom of expression, the area has not developed into anything more than just that. Because the area has been “known for” a certain type of merchandise and culture,...

Annotated Bibliography #9

Image from Huffington Post article by F. Kaid Benfield. The Summary and Evidence This picture exhibits an example of a neighborhood that promotes walking and cycling. Sidewalks can be seen, and this encourages residents to walk or cycle to their destinations if it is within a reasonable distance. It also shows a father and daughter who are on bicycles, and are putting the sidewalks available to good use. The image provides an example of how the built environment can be used to improve health, and it can be used as a model to use in Atlanta neighborhoods that do not contain features such as sidewalks. Why this Source? I chose this source because it shows a way that the built environment can be used to impact health in a positive way. Flaws/Weaknesses A flaw this picture contains is that it depicts a more suburban community. In an urban city such as Atlanta, it may not be easy to incorporate features such as sidewalks. How is it Related? This picture builds onto another annotated bibliography I did on the walkability of neighborhoods....

Just a few MARTA stops away

The Lake Claire Community Land Trust is conveniently placed walking distance from the Edgewood/Candler Park train station. You can look over one of the hills and see the train passing by and even see the buildings of our busy little city, Atlanta. “From Edgewood/Candler Park MARTA station (Blue Line), cross pedestrian bridge over Dekalb Ave. Turn east on Dekalb and walk approx. 1/2 mile to Nelms Ave., one block past Clifton Rd. Cross Nelms and turn left on diagonal path up the...

The Rainbow Flag

This rainbow flag hangs in the open area next to the fire pit. Each color is a representaion of what this community embodies and has a symbol to go along with them. The flag has “Courage”, “Joy”, “Spirit”, “Celebrate!”, “Community”, “Equality”, and “Diveristy” written upon it. These are all values that each neoghbor believes...
css.php