Annotated Bibliography 4: How Natural and Built Environments Impact Human Health

Khmer, Steve. Children playing on tree. Digital image. Panoramio.com. N.p., 2 Nov. 2009. Web. 19 Feb. 2016. Entry #4 Wells, Nancy, Dr. “How Natural and Built Environments Impact Human Health.” Cornell University College of Human Ecology. Web. 19 Feb. 2016. Dr. Nancy Wells’ research led to her conclusion that a natural environment featuring wildlife and plants is beneficial to humans in more ways than one.  Not only did she confirm the findings of the authors of “Recognizing Campuses as Learning Spaces,” but she also went more in-depth into the actual benefits of an open landscape.  Her article states that a natural living space promotes exercise, offers a sense of community, and opens up new forms of recreation to the public.  Her studies also show that citizens who live in such an environment are prone to living longer lives.  In built-environments, where the land is not as pedestrian-friendly, citizens have shown less recreational activity and higher rates of crime.  There is one flaw in her experiment however, as her subjects were not selected randomly.  Wells also tested children for data as well.  Research shows that green environments foster social interaction and offer more social support while children of more built environments undergo more stressful...

Changing How Student’s Learn Through Campus Landscaping

Campus with Nature The way a campus is structured has an impact on how students in the school learn. Back then, campuses were designed to look apart from other environments so students could feel that they are in a “learning environment” but with an area to move freely ( Scholl 53). Now campuses are made to steer students in different learning experience. There a two focuses “help conceptualize future campus planning in relation to student learning” ( Scholl 53). 1) “direct and indirect attention and restoration” 2) “holistic landscape” The addition of natural landscapes and views from the indoors to a natural landscape enables the individual in the campus to be calm, as well refreshed. The use of “nature” can “help to maintain or restore cognitive function such as direct attention, problem solving, focus and concentration, impulse inhibition, and memory” ( Scholl 55). A “holistic landscape” provides students with restoration. Even little things like more space in classroom seats can augment a student’s learning experience. Spatial...
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