Reading Summary 3: Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’

The main purpose of this article is to argue about the setup of bathrooms. The author feels that the terms for entering bathrooms have been fixed. Bathrooms are clearly marked men and women but the author feels that it’s unfair especially for transgender people. The author also feels that if a mistake is made by a male of female and the wrong restroom is entered, it can put the person at risk to discomfort or even real trouble. Throughout the article, the author uses examples from different cases that have come about from the controversy of bathroom usage, specifically transgender cases. The author argues on the side that is for changing the bathroom laws and for bathrooms to become more accommodating to the transgender community. Bathrooms usage laws have been a controversy for many years because, “The problem is that this vastly oversimplifies the experience of transgender people and the biology of chromosomes, which can appear in other...

Reading Summary 4: “Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’”

In Bazelon’s article, “Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’”, states that as transgender people are becoming more common, their decision on which bathroom to use has not gotten any simpler. Because of the long history of separate bathroom facilities, it has proven difficult to change society’s way of thinking in their design. Transgender people and their supporters are rallying for the redesign of male and female bathrooms. This movement, however has created a large opposition. It has been proven difficult to people to begin to truly view transgender women as women and men as men. In Houston, a campaign has been going on called the “bathroom ordinance”, which strongly opposes the mixing of gender bathrooms and locker rooms. Some oppose the change because they view the female bathroom as a “relaxing ‘all-female enclave’” and do not want to give that up to share with men. Although many people do not agree with this movement, places such as public schools have met the needs of their transgender students by allowing them to select the gender they most identify with and allow them to participate in all school activities as their chosen gender. In the debate about bathrooms, many have used the word “accommodate”, which has been taken as a derogatory term to some because it points out that these people are different or not normal. Others take the word to mean that society is beginning to change and starting to meet the needs of the country’s transgender people.  Resources are available to transgenders to help them show others that they are indeed in the right restroom, by using tactics such as showing...

“Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’” Summary

In this article, Emily Bazelon discusses how public restrooms should be a place where one feels comfortable because they are in vulnerable space. She states people don’t want to feel threatened or scared when they enter the bathroom. Society has dictated which restrooms people use by placing signs or pictures depicting a male or female figure on the doors. Bazelon makes a call for action directed towards the designers of public places to make bathrooms more accommodating for everyone. She talks about how transgender students want to be able to change in their desired gender locker rooms at schools and how schools are handling this issue. She compares the issue of transgender people not being able to use the bathroom to disabled individuals “who are shut out by doors they [can] not open and stairs they [can] not climb”. She states that if society can be accommodating for people with disabilities, then we should also be accommodating for transgender people who want to be able to “shower near [their] peers in [their] own stall”. Schools have made an effort to make these individuals feel included by allowing them to participate in sports and using these students’ preferred pronouns. The author wants to bring attention to fact that transgender people are not treated...

Reading Summary #4

Terry Singh 2/17/2016 ENGL1102 Reading Summary #4   Making bathrooms more accommodating       In the article Making Bathrooms More Accommodating By EMILY BAZELON, the central idea is about men and women sharing a Bathroom and the problems that they face doing it. She Starts the article off with many reasons why it would fail as a plan to make man and women share. Starting off with an example of a man creeping on a little girl in a stall and then going on to stating the problems we already encounter with transgenders and bathrooms. The example used is a transgender in high school in Illinois, who identifies as a girl but isn’t allowed to shower with them due to she is different; so they make her shower in a room by herself. Here is when the word accommodation comes into play and then examples of the government giving accommodation to other peoples such as in 1960, Congress gave religious people the right to a reasonable accommodation at work. This has given the transgenders the feeling that they have been doing all the accommodating and know one is accommodating for them.       Women not accomodating in the 1940’s is an example of whats going on now, when they didnt want to share their bathroom with african american females. The article alsostarts to go into detail about how women look at their bathroom differently than men. They go and talk in the bathroom with their “girlfreinds” and can stay in the bathroom for long periods of time just talking. Where is a guy isnt going to stay in the...

Accommodation for Gender Equivalency in Public Bathrooms

In the article Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating,’ Emily Bazelon raises the awareness of the social restraints that derive from the evolving society in America—directly pertaining to the subject of gender. In particular, the author addresses the most obvious form of gender segregation in the interior design of everyday facilities: bathrooms. The separation of sexes through bathrooms, or locker rooms, has been accepted as a social norm since women entered the working world, but with the ascending awareness and population of transgender citizens, an aching issue is revealed: individuals find it difficult to enter a bathroom comfortably. A transgender woman identifies herself as a woman, and therefore she would prefer to enter the women’s bathroom, “but some other women can only see them as men, and so they don’t want to make room” (Bazelon). Today, the definition of male and female does not solely pertain to the physical manifestation of the body when a girl or boy is born, because now science and social-standards have progressed to a point where a person can choose the way in which to be called. Gender no longer has two simple options and has become a blurry subject. Therefore, instead of maintaining gender-specific bathrooms, the author calls to attention the need for accommodation. The author provides the reader with a clear explanation of what it means to accommodate: ”to adapt, to bring into agreement or harmony, to furnish with something desired or needed, to favor or oblige” (Bazelon). The author informs the readers that accommodations have already been made in order to accept racial diversity, individuals with disabilities and in terms of the freedom...
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