Campus Design to Ease the Mind

As interest in higher education continues to escalate, authors Kathleen G. Scholl and Gowri Betrabet Gulwadi inform readers as to why campuses are designed in a particular way that inevitably distinguish them as learning facilities through the article Recognizing Campus Landscapes as Learning Spaces. Along with this idea, the authors also elaborate on the way campuses are designed in order to provide students with mental stability—the science that motivates campus blueprinting. Because students require a large sum of focus on a daily basis and thus leading to fatigue, campuses are built as a form of service for mental relief. Through open spaces, landscapes, and/or nature, students are able to experience a shift in mental state. The authors explain this shift by categorizing different types of attention students experience: direct and indirect (Scholl & Gulwadi 55). Direct attention is essential in everyday functioning, but the most demanding among the rest. This kind of attention relates to one’s own discipline to be attentive. For instance, this is the kind of attention necessary to sit still, silently, and absorb the information given through a long lecture–the attention needed to be productive in any task or profession. This kind of attention is typically located within closed doors. Indirect attention is what the authors refer to as “involuntary,” and therefore this attention pertains to aspects of the environment that one simply notices instead of intentionally focusing attention (Scholl & Gulwadi 55). Because this attention occurs involuntarily, it occurs when something captures interest. If the landscaping does a decent job at capturing attention, students seek the sources that trigger mental relief. This shift in attention allows the mind...
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