Annotated Bib #9: “Women in tech: Scarcity, Sexism, and Solutions”

Jen Heilemann. “Women in Tech:Scarcity, Sexism, and Solutions.” The storyexchange. N.p., 9 Apr. 2013. Web. Jen Heilemann is a Developer at The Nerdery, which is a company for custom software design and development. Helieman feels “female participation in Computer Science and particularly programming conferences is pitiful” and she offers a link to a number of statistics that support her idea. These links lead to credible sources. She states that “in 1987, 42% of software developers in the US were women, while today, that number hovers around 28%.” “Today” is reference to the year 2013, the reader could question whether these numbers are still active. The author then talks about how the number of female participants in the industry varies and leads to the “Steve Rule”, blatantly stating there would be greater number of men named “Steve” than female participants. It is said that culture has a lot to do with this, because according to society men and women are suppose to assume a certain role. In the end the author offers incidents to support the claim of sex-based discrimination and she offers some solutions. This source is useful. It offers good detail and the author offers links in order to support her claims. The article was published in 2013, so some of the information may have updated. I feel this article is very useful looking to discover the effects of gender on digital...

UPS and Deaf Drivers

Girion, Lisa. “UPS Ban on Deaf Drivers Is Rejected.” Los Angeles Times 11 Oct. 2006. Web. 29 Mar. 2016. Lisa Girion and Molly Selvin are two LA Times Staff Writers, who gave the report “UPS Ban on Deaf Drivers Is Rejected, confirming that UPS has been discriminating against their deaf workers by not letting them drive the trucks. The evidence proven are quotes from one of UPS’s deaf workers and information given from the case and some knowledge about the ADA. The authors purpose is to share with its viewers on how UPS had given a stereotype about deaf people and driving and why they did not want them to drive their trucks, which is against the law. This is supported by the ADA, this will help the viewers understand that you are not supposed to discriminate against those who have disabilities, but to treat them as equals because they are equals.The intended audience are for those who read the LA Times paper and those who want to know more about how UPS really cares about their workers.The source can be useful to researchers and those who wanted to know ore about the case at that particular time and now. The resource can be used as a reference in a thesis or article on deaf people and how they are treated in the...

UPS Return-To-Work Rule

13, February, and 2014. “EEOC Can Contest UPS Return-to-Work Rule As Illegal Qualification Standard Under ADA.” N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Mar. 2016. Patrick Dorrian, works for Daily Labor Report, which is a part of the Bloomberg Bureau of National Affairs, where he gives reports of national court cases, to signify the injustice of disabled people associated with UPS.The evidence provided are those specific quotes from the EEOC and ADA about protecting those with disabilities. The author wants the readers to know that just because your disability may take a great hindrance in your life does not mean you should be fired just because. The author wants the reader to know that this is very unjust and was rued in the favor of the EEOC because this was under the ADA article, which protects those with disabilities. The intended  audience are those doing research of the social injustice that  UPS has against those with disabilities. The resource is helpful because it lends out information about court cases that ruled in the favor of those who have a disability used against them at their...

UPS Hypertension

Smith-Duer, Barbara M. “Too Disabled or Not Disabled Enough: Between a Rock and a Hard Place after Murphy v. United Parcel Service, Inc.” Washburn Law Journal 39 (1999–2000): 255. Web. Barbara M.Smith-Duer, publishes her works on the Washburn Law Journal, giving incite on the Murphy v. UPS case. The name of the article is “Too Disabled or Not Disabled Enough: Between a Rock and a Hard Place after Murphy v. United Parcel Service, Inc.”, which ensues that some companies do not particularly want to have disabled people working for their company. The evidence proven in this article are quotes from the case and other cases similar to this case. The authors purpose is to educate the reader on the fact that people with disabilities are discriminated against, because they are not as able body as someone without a disability. the author wants you to know that this is wrong and many people with disabilities can work just hard as an able bodied person could. The intended audience are those who may be disabled or want to know more about the rights of disabled people. The source is helpful because it gives you information about the discrimination of those who do not function as well as others and how we are progressing from this discrimination. The source is highly credible, since it is coming from a law...

AB Disabled by Design

The discrimination of modern architectural designed against the disabled. (Simone Becchetti via Getty Images) Clark Miller, Claire Gordon. “Disabled by Design.” How a lack of imagination in technology keeps the world inaccessible to huge numbers of people.N.p., n.d. Web.   Clark Miller, the associate director of the Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes at Arizona State University teamed up with Claire Gordon, a researcher of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education whom focused on the Army teamed up to write “Disabled by Design”, an article in which is primarily focused on the concept that “technology’s patterns force people to design their own bodies to fit in—or those patterns exclude people from participation when they don’t fit.” Miller uses Regan Brashears’s film Fixed to show that in society today ” the most common response is to call for technology to fix disabled bodies– Rather than designing the world so that a diverse population can function and thrive within it.”   (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Paul Gorman/Released) One of the supporting arguments given is the research conducted by the Claire Gordon on the U.S. Black Hawk helicopter. In this study Gordon informs her audience on the architectural exclusion of the U.S. Black Hawk. Gordon states “while the engineers used conventional standards to construct the design of workstations and equipment in the cockpit that is fit for 90% of the users,– in the general Army population, more than one-third of female soldiers and almost three-quarters of Hispanic female soldiers physically did not have the right size or shape body to fly a Black Hawk. ”   “Disabled by Design” was written to influence the...
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