A Threefold Typology

Constructing Genre: A Threefold Typology Constructing Genre: A Threefold Typology, by Donna J. Kain, TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION QUARTERLY, Technical Communication Quarterly, 14 (4), 375–409. 2005, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. East Carolina University, built environment, shaped spaces. The article team was concerned with built environments, spaces shaped articulated, designed, and constructed in ways that have often excluded people. The term genre has been used to describe “stabilized-for-now” (Schryer, “Records”) amalgamations of rhetorical strategies, content, and form to mediate ongoing activities, social relationships, and systems of activities. Theorists argue persuasively that, as typifications of discursive actions, genres allow people to recognize and act on the social purposes of texts within particular contexts (e.g., Miller). Consequently, much genre research and theory over the past twenty years has concentrated on texts that are routine, recurring forms of discourse enacted within communities, or among communities that interact in larger “networks” (Bazerman, “Systems”). Theorists discuss genre in two ways simultaneously: (1) plurally, as actual types of Discourse in use, and (2) singularly, as a concept for categorizing, and strategically-applied knowledge about interpreting, managing, constructing, and negotiating discourse specific genres such as medical diagnoses and evaluations of learning-disabled students. Thus, the identities of people with disabilities and their access to social in stitutions and spaces have in the past largely been articulated by and to others employers, courts, and medical professionals, architects—not by those who have disabilities (Barton; Parr and Butler; M. Russell). Lateral thinking and lateral membership envelope the expertise pool and impart a genre of the group as rhetoric or rhetorical text. New members of a genre must learn the vocabulary of the community and...

Bibliography of Margret Morton

Margaret Morton, Fragile Dwelling (New York: Aperture, 2000). Margaret Morton, The Tunnel (Yale University Press, Fall 1995. Margret Morton uses her photography as a social witness of real-life conditions of the Homeless.  Morton uses discretion when she photographs the Homeless and tries not to invade privacy or trespass too closely.  Her photographs engage levels of social order through observation, that generate a response, and inspire political action. proceeds from her book and photographs are donated to the Coalition for the Homeless, New York, a non-profit beneficiary. Fragile Dwelling is sponsored by The Buhl Foundation, Coalition for the Homeless.  Margret Morton’s ongoing project are supported by grants and Art...
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