Man or Woman? Who cares?!: A summary of “Making Bathrooms More Accommodating”

An image of the “idea” of unisex bathrooms “Making Bathrooms More Accommodating” was written by Emily Bazelon, where she raises awareness on to the gender discrimination against bathrooms. The the author suggests that bathrooms are “the clearest visual markers of sex difference” and not many people are open the collision of male and female bathrooms. The author references a law proposed in Houston that ruled out discrimination of any kind at any place. The opposing side of the law on the idea of men and women sharing restroom space and played on the fears of voters by promoting assault against women. Transgenders are accepted within the school districts, but they still struggle with deciding where to get undressed or use the restroom. The article talks about the experience of a high school transgender girl not being allowed to shower in the girls’ locker room and later receiving a stall with a curtain This event supports the idea of “accommodation” that the author feels presents itself as relevant when talking about accessing bathrooms. The author states that this a confusing concept to the public, because it is not the norm. Gender based segregated restrooms began in the 19th century once men felt that women were taking over their space. This concept became a social norm that people were afraid to change. The author suggests an “all-gender” restrooms to accommodate this issue and that it has the potential to be what is considered “normal”. The overall purpose for accommodating restrooms is so that a person of any gender can feel like they...

Reading Summary #4

BAZELON, EMILY. “Making Bathrooms More Accommodating.” New York Times Magazine. 17 November 2015. Web. 2 January 2016. This article focuses on bathroom accommodations for individuals. It starts off discussing bathrooms and how they are the most common markers of sex differences. Bazelon goes on to explain that “restrooms are a public convenience, freely available and in principle open to all, but the terms for entering them have been fixed”.  This can cause discomfort to some and transgender people are asking for society to rethink, from designs to signs to who can enter places. She discusses a vote in Houston where voters rejected a “broad equal rights ordinance” that protected against discrimination in housing and employment, as well as public spaces. She talks about changes in school districts, discussing that they have “generally agreed to call transgender students by their preferred names and pronouns, and allowed them to join the sports team of the gender with which they identify”. She claims that although these changes have been made, deciding where they can change, shower, and use the bathroom has been trickier. She discusses a civil rights complaint from suburban Illinois where the department of education intervened. She focuses on the definition of accommodate and discusses that in detail. She says “it can have a compulsory aspect – it’s a word that involves moving over to make room for others, whether you want to or not”. Bazelon then talks about activists and how they have chafed the use of the word “accommodation” because its interpreted as a distinction between normal and the other. This word offers the possibility of mutual give...

Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’ by Emily Bazelon

Overview In Emily Bazelon’s article, “Making Bathrooms More Accommodating,” she addresses the issues that separating bathroom facilities based on sex has for people who are transgender. What’s the big deal? calbuzz.com | Transgender Bathrooms | Transgender individuals face humiliation and bullying for entering the “wrong” bathroom As society continues to battle over accepting transgender individuals as the norm, another issue has developed for transgender people. Many times, these people are subject to the humiliation of being told they cannot use the bathroom of the gender that they identify as. Emily Bazelon uses the example of high schools that agree to call transgender students by their chosen name, and classify them as their chosen gender, except when it comes to the locker-room. Such high schools do not allow transgender students to use the locker room of the opposite anatomical sex. This means that transgender girls are not allowed to change in the girls’ locker room. Movements to combine bathrooms and allow the entry of both men and women have been met with opposition. In Houston early November 2015, a broad equal rights ordinance was rejected. Although this ordinance protected against discrimination in housing, employment, and public spaces based on age, race, sexual orientation, and gender identity, opponents zeroed in on the fact that this would mean the integration of public bathrooms. They created “No Men in Women’s Bathrooms” t-shirts and an ad seen below, pointing out the dangers of integrating bathroom facilities. Bazelon points out that while people resist the idea of mixing the sexes in bathrooms and locker rooms, deeming it unsafe and a violation of privacy, this is...
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