Annotated Bibliographies #1-#10

Annotated Bibliography #1 Carmona, Matthew. “The Place-Shaping Continuum: A Theory Of Urban Design Process.” Journal Of Urban Design 19.1 (2014): 2-36. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. This article discusses Urban Design. It begins by discussing urban design as a subject for investigation. This article focuses on London. It has a section called “Understanding Urban Design Process”. This section relates to the built environment in Atlanta because it goes into detail to discuss and understand Urban Design and how it is undertaken in different places, big or small. The next section discusses how urban design is situation in both place and time. How we act today is shaped by history of experience and practice. The urban design process starts before developmental proposals and these build up over a long period of time that causes changes all the way up to the present. It then gets into the actual process of urban design: designing, developing, using, and managing. This article is very detailed and well explained which is why I chose this source. There are a few terms and ideas in this article that are not defined which makes it a little difficult at times to understand exactly what the main point is. This source is scholarly making it a little difficult to read, but very informative and useful. Annotated Bibliography #2 Inam, Aseem. “From Dichotomy to Dialectic: Practicing Theory in Urban Design.” Journal of Urban Design 16.2 (2011): 257-277. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. This article discusses dichotomy in practicing urban design. This article helps to address the assumption that theory and practice do not necessarily...

“Architectural Exclusion” by Sarah Schindler Summary

Sarah Schindler, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law, presents a creditable, well detailed article depicting the “tactics” of racial architectural artists. Schindler claims that architects subliminally blind and intentionally separate our society using additional “exclusionary” designs. In Schindler’s words, “The built environment is characterized by man-made features that make it difficult for certain individuals- often poor people and people of color- to access certain places.” Throughout the article, Schindler describes different aspects of the built structures that separate our community. One specific scenario expresses the discrimination within our city lines of Atlanta, Ga. Our own “Metropolitan Atlanta Regional Transit Authority, aka MARTA, vocally chose to deteriorate African American’s opportunities by letting northern white residents refuse the expanse of the transportation route. This decision deprives African American’s of the chance to succeed just by keeping their source of transportation away from areas where jobs are flourishing most. The routes keep African American’s captivated within the routes lines and force them settle for a job in which they make barely enough to get by. The point is for whites to dominate their domain, job and neighborhood and be left unbothered by colored...

Internal Built Environment Description: Rhodes Hall (part four)

The inauguration of Jefferson Davis Depiction of Stonewall Jackson at the first battle of Manassas Robert E. Lee right before surrendering This is, in my opinion, the most fascinating part of the entire mansion. These three painted-glass window panels were installed to depict the rise and fall of the confederacy. There was a lot of southern nationalism around this time in history as the southern surrender was approaching it’s 40th anniversary and several Confederate generals died right around this time. The first panel depicts the inauguration of Confederate president Jefferson Davis above and the Battle of Fort Sumter below. The second panel shows the Confederate victory at the First Battle of Manassas with “Stonewall” Jackson earning his nickname. Finally, the third panel depicts Confederate General Robert E. Lee saying goodbye to his soldiers right before departing to go sign the terms of surrender at Appomattox Courthouse. The level of detail of these fixtures is absolutely incredible; you can get up close and see the individual soldiers and details of their faces and uniforms. All three windows are divided by portraits of over a dozen important Confederate figures. Window in a closet below the staircase Finally, this last window kind of put into perspective the mindset of the architect and of Amos Giles Rhodes when this house was being designed. This window is in a small closet below the staircase and the rest of the windows and was supposed to be symbolic of taking down the Confederate Flag and storing it away in order to let go of the past while still honoring the sense of southern heritage that many...

Internal Built Environment Description: Rhodes Hall (part three)

Back room on the first floor that is now used as an office The contrast between different styles of interior decoration in the home give indication of their purpose. The grandiose front rooms (dining room, Parlor, etc.) have some paintings on the walls and ceilings or expensive wall paper and were intended to be used for entertaining guests, while this out-of-the-way back room is very sparse except for some woodwork around the door frame. Birds-eye view of the Rhodes Center layout Directory of stores in Rhodes Center Another captivating chapter in the history of the Rhodes Hall came in 1937 when Atlanta’s first shopping center, Rhodes Center, was opened. It consisted of one story marble-faced store fronts running along the north, west and south perimeters of the property. In an interesting combination of private-residence-turned-government-property mixed with retail space, this is a perfect example of how the changing needs of a community affects the built environment it occupies. Today only the vacant buildings along the south side of the plot remain as a visage of the once bustling strip mall. Continue Reading … The remaining south building of Rhodes...

Internal Built Environment Description: Rhodes Hall (part two)

Vaulted Ceiling of Living Room Painting of coastal Georgia on wall of the living room The perimeter of the living room floor is lined with intricate patterns using woods of different shades Stained glass above the front door The Grand stair-case with the painted glass windows behind it. Banister of the Grand stair-case One of the First thing one noticed when walking into the house is the stained glass window above the front door bearing the overlapped letters “AGR”, the initials of Amos Giles Rhodes (which seemed slightly egotistical to me). The next thing you see after passing the threshold of the front entrance is the expansive, very open landing area/living room with exquisite woodworking on the walls and scenes from the Georgian and Floridian coast painted along the tops of the walls. The vaulted ceiling holds light bulbs in each individual square compartment which was a very novel feature for homes at the time. The room contains the large semi-circle grand staircase to the left and is topped off with a large wood burning fireplace (unique in that fact as most of the other fireplaces are coal-burning). Another impressive feature of this room is the Banister on the stair-case, which is carved into a very ornate lion with a shield displayed across it’s chest. The house had a slight antique-esque smell that is only ever authentically produced by buildings that are similar in age to this one. This smell is very much that of aging wood, something to be expected of Rhodes Hall as the interior is rife with wooden ornamentation (the most striking of which being the...
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