Accommodation for Gender Equivalency in Public Bathrooms

In the article Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating,’ Emily Bazelon raises the awareness of the social restraints that derive from the evolving society in America—directly pertaining to the subject of gender. In particular, the author addresses the most obvious form of gender segregation in the interior design of everyday facilities: bathrooms. The separation of sexes through bathrooms, or locker rooms, has been accepted as a social norm since women entered the working world, but with the ascending awareness and population of transgender citizens, an aching issue is revealed: individuals find it difficult to enter a bathroom comfortably. A transgender woman identifies herself as a woman, and therefore she would prefer to enter the women’s bathroom, “but some other women can only see them as men, and so they don’t want to make room” (Bazelon). Today, the definition of male and female does not solely pertain to the physical manifestation of the body when a girl or boy is born, because now science and social-standards have progressed to a point where a person can choose the way in which to be called. Gender no longer has two simple options and has become a blurry subject. Therefore, instead of maintaining gender-specific bathrooms, the author calls to attention the need for accommodation. The author provides the reader with a clear explanation of what it means to accommodate: ”to adapt, to bring into agreement or harmony, to furnish with something desired or needed, to favor or oblige” (Bazelon). The author informs the readers that accommodations have already been made in order to accept racial diversity, individuals with disabilities and in terms of the freedom...
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