Digital Built Environment Images, Signage, etc. (CDC.gov)

http://sites.gsu.edu/myoung59/files/2016/04/CDC-1iints7.mp4 Here’s a video that showcases the basic structure of the website. The website is broken up into drop-down menus, a giant banner, and different sections. The main colors of the website are blue and white, which provide a calming effect. It appears minimalistic and is easy to navigate. No flashy colors, effects, or sounds. Here’s a picture of a family of non-whites outside, advertising National Minority Month. This gives me the impression that the CDC is interested in the health of minorities. To stretch it a little further, it seems to promote extended families as well. Here’s a picture of the main banner that is the center stage of the www.CDC.gov site. Easy to see and it features what I presume to be what the CDC believes is the most important. At the present moment that is the Zika virus and how it affects the unborn. Here’s a picture of a white woman working on something while wearing protective goggles, earmuffs, and an apron with the caption “Improving Workplace Safety and Health”. This gives me the impression that the CDC is interested in appealing women from all different job occupations, even ones where they’re a very small minority....

UPS and Their Great Diversity

I started my internet stalking at three in the evening, I made sure to give myself tie to look over every aspect of this page. As usual, the company logo appears as the page loads up. You see the symbolic brown and yellow on their banner stretched across the home page. The first image to truly catch my eye was this picture of a plane’s engine. I believe that it was the right engine if I am not too sure. This plane’s engine could mean that UPS does not only work on the ground, but also delivers airmail. I believe it can also show that they are international which means that they have a big diversity group. I continue to look around the home page and there is a tool bar on the left which basically goes over shipment, package tracking and pick-up. I love how you do not need to go through many pages just to track your package because you can simply just type in your tracking number in the box to your left. This would be great for seniors or an other person who may not be as tech savvy as some people.  If you want to keep up with the latest new on UPS it is also right there on the front page. Some websites require you to do a bit of digging to find an article related to the company. So, in order to find out more about the “isms” I had to do some searching because I did my annotated bibliographies on disabled people. I did not find any pictures of disabled people, but...

UPS Girl Power

  Under the industries tab Retail, you click on it and this is what you see. This is just beauty in all its glory, but also a bit of dirt. I love how the women in the pictures are both business oriented. This shows that women can be the driving force in a company. If you want to go by ethnicity, they are all women of color. As a minority especially in America, I was very happy to see women on the front page of the tabs. I also noticed the women who are interacting with the UPS workers are both wearing red. That is very strange to me. Now that I think about it, women who wear red are seen as more desirable. Are they mking the women in this photo wear red to make them more desirable or appealing to sell clothing. I also did not like the stereotype that women usually work in retail, which is not true. I guess they associated women shopping their little hearts out with retail. This was the only ill feeling towards the retail page, but everything else is...

Annotated Bib #9: “Women in tech: Scarcity, Sexism, and Solutions”

Jen Heilemann. “Women in Tech:Scarcity, Sexism, and Solutions.” The storyexchange. N.p., 9 Apr. 2013. Web. Jen Heilemann is a Developer at The Nerdery, which is a company for custom software design and development. Helieman feels “female participation in Computer Science and particularly programming conferences is pitiful” and she offers a link to a number of statistics that support her idea. These links lead to credible sources. She states that “in 1987, 42% of software developers in the US were women, while today, that number hovers around 28%.” “Today” is reference to the year 2013, the reader could question whether these numbers are still active. The author then talks about how the number of female participants in the industry varies and leads to the “Steve Rule”, blatantly stating there would be greater number of men named “Steve” than female participants. It is said that culture has a lot to do with this, because according to society men and women are suppose to assume a certain role. In the end the author offers incidents to support the claim of sex-based discrimination and she offers some solutions. This source is useful. It offers good detail and the author offers links in order to support her claims. The article was published in 2013, so some of the information may have updated. I feel this article is very useful looking to discover the effects of gender on digital...

Silence is Not Bliss

  John. “Gender Disparities in the Design Field.” Smashing Magazine 12 Nov. 2010: 1-2. Print.   The author separates the article into four controversial topics dealing with gender issues. The first topic is statistics- a poll to demonstrate how many web designers are male and female. 82.6% of web designers are male. The author gives this example to show how predominate men are in that field. Since men are dominate the web designing, women voices are not heard. So that means men can’t accommodate women’s needs. The second topic is perceptions. The  author talks about how males and females are perceived throughout the world differently while doing the same thing. One example the author gives to support this idea was when 2009 Google was the talk of the web when someone noticed when you type “she invented” into the search bar, did you mean “he invented” pops up on the screen. Indirectly saying that women can’t invent anything and that only men can. The third and fourth topics are conditioning and status quo. They both talk about how society is slowly opening up different job that are typically “masculine” to women. This article is related to the research that I am doing because if  women opinions and ideas are not heard they won’t be reflected into any work even interior designs, but if they are heard their ideas and opinions will be...
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