2015 Urban Mobility Scorecard (Annotated Bibliography Thirteen)

Concluding Thoughts. 23. Texas A&M Transportation Institute. Texas A&M Transportation Institute, Aug. 2015. Web. 28 Apr. 2016. <http://d2dtl5nnlpfr0r.cloudfront.net/tti.tamu.edu/documents/mobility-scorecard-2015.pdf>. This is report done by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute that discusses traffic congestion, what causes it, and what can be done to reduce it. In the report traffic congestion is described as a kind of tax that wastes the time and money of people. The report points to a number of contributory causes such as poor public transportation and lack of alternatives to...

The Built Environment and its Effects on Atlanta’s Traffic Congestion (Built Environment Analysis Final)

Atlanta, Georgia possesses higher amounts of traffic than Boston, Massachusetts because the cities built environment encourages it. City planners and policy makers must realize this and take steps towards changing what they can about the existing built environment to alleviate this problem as well as making sure their future designs account for the impact the built environment has on traffic; otherwise, the traffic in Atlanta will continue to disproportionately worsen as the population grows, bringing with it longer commutes and more pollution. Before I describe what exactly it is about the built environment in Atlanta that encourages traffic, I’m going to present some facts about Atlanta in comparison to Boston. My goal with this comparison is to demonstrate that Atlanta indeed has a traffic problem and to provide some interesting differences between the two cities and raise some questions. In Atlanta the population density is about 3,360 people per square mile while Boston, Massachusetts has a population density of about 13,340 people per square mile. That’s a stark difference and under normal circumstances one would assume based on this information that Atlanta would have much less traffic congestion. Surprisingly, that is untrue. According to <insert>, the number of hours wasted in traffic in Atlanta during 2015 was 59 versus 64 in Boston. Another interesting discrepancy between Atlanta and Boston is the number of people who own automobiles. In Atlanta 20.39% of the population owns no vehicle and 42.20% of the population owns one vehicle. On the other hand, 39.51% of Boston’s population owns no vehicle and 38.51% of the population owns one vehicle. Based on this data, there is...

MARTA MAYHEM

MARTA Mayhem Can you believe that since the beginning of MARTA, in 1979, MARTA has transported more than 5 billion commuters? If you’re like me, and an Atlanta Native, then you probably find this statistic highly shocking. Especially since MARTA is represented and historically known as a poor transit system that pushes more inhabitants towards carpooling or using their own form of transportation. It is a public rail system that only serves certain areas of the city and if they chose not to expand its coverage areas and invest in programs and technologies to increase the public’s perception then we, in Atlanta, will have one of the most underutilized public transit system for the amount of population in the United States. It is a complete necessity for cities the size of ours to have a well-rounded, efficient and user friendly mode of transportation or we will no longer be the thriving city we are at this point in time. In general, MARTA must morph into a well-oiled machine by appealing to the new workforce, creating an efficient system, making people feel comfortable and connecting more areas of the city otherwise it is doomed to fail in what is most definitely the most populated but sprawled out city in the Nation. The below image shows exactly why Atlanta needs an improved and efficient system. IT IS HUGE.   Atlanta, a town known for diversity, but still highly populated with prejudices, brings me to my point that MARTA must completely revamp if they want to appeal to both sides of the “riders spectrum” this ranges from the working class citizens that...

Annotated Bibliography Ten (Reducing Car Trips in Atlanta)

In this blog entry Darin Givens examines an interview with Jim Durrett of the Buckhead Community Improvement by the website Curbed Atlantic. In the entry Givens argues that unless the built environment in Atlanta is changed into something that is more bicycle and pedestrian friendly, then people will continue to rely on mostly cars, creating traffic. He also makes an interesting point about public transportation. He believes the reason why it seems the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) is lackluster is because the design of the city is sprawling; in other words, everything is spread out, encouraging the use of cars and discouraging bicycling, walking, and public transportation. At the end of the blog entry Givens also touches upon telecommuting and how it isn’t an adequate solution because it doesn’t necessarily promote alternative transportation and smart growth. Givens, Darin. “Atlurbanist.” Web log post. Reducing Car Trips in Atlanta The Quote in This… ATL Urbanist, May 2015. Web. 01 Apr....

Annotated Bibliography 8

Downs, Anthony. “Traffic: Why It’s Getting Worse, What Government Can Do.” The Brookings Institution. Accessed March 27, 2016. http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2004/01/01transportation-downs. “The Importance of Green Spaces in Improving the Health of Communities.” The Playing Field, November 26, 2014. http://theplayingfield.org.uk/importance-green-spaces-improving-health-communities/. Downs, Anthony. “Traffic: Why It’s Getting Worse, What Government Can Do.” The Brookings Institution. Accessed March 27, 2016. http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2004/01/01transportation-downs.     Traffic is a major problem in the city of Atlanta. There has been contemplation of how to fix this problem in the built environment. Options include greatly expanding road capacity and greatly expanding public transportation but these ideas do not make sense realistically.  The article suggests that the only solution to the problem is to deal with it because it is nearly impossible to eliminate congestion completely. The article does give ideas to slow down the rate it occurs in the future. Police could, “Respond more rapidly to traffic-blocking accidents and incidents”.  We could also build more roads in growing areas but there are also some opponents to this idea believing it may cause more travelers. More High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lanes  and High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lanes, can be created to add to the overall capacity. The article also implies that, “traffic congestion often results from economic prosperity and other types of success”. Heavy traffic is a problem that has to be solved with...
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