Reading Summary 2

“His & Her: Designing for a Post-Gender Society” by Suzanne Tick is an article that evaluates the depiction of gender and the influence of acceptance in this changing society. Accommodating all ‘genders’ is something all designers “should focus a critical eye on society’s issues, need to work within this discourse and help promote acceptance and change” Tick recognizes ‘design landscape’ as modernism and it being molded by male perspective. Even in history, men are seen as having power and strength whilst women are looked down upon. The dominance that men have in this society has been embedded historically in designs created to accommodate and work for them. In a world of technology, more than half being men, are often more involved and are more encouraged to work toward a more sustainable world. But after modernism, a rise in feminism occurred. In today’s news feminist are making more of a statement than ever before. Tick uses Emma Watson, an actress and UN Women Goodwill Ambassador, as an example. She strives for men to join a movement that pushes for gender equality. The usage of this helps structure her argument for an equal society. Men have started to realize that women are more prevalent in the workplace than ever before. This changes many things. Tick states “The time is ripe for designers to start questioning how they incorporate gender sensitivity into their work.” Nowadays girls that look like boys and boys that look like girls isn’t completely bizarre. In order to recognize the changes in society in regards to gender, people have to adjust and conform. The people who don’t identify...

Reading Summary 1

“Making Bathrooms More ‘Accomodating'” by Emily Bazelzon examines the issues associated with transgender people and bathrooms. Bazelzon addresses in her introduction how society and the ‘norm’ has put a strain on those who see a problem with labeling public places “Transgender people..are asking society to rethink all of this, from signs, to design to who gets to enter where. Since the 19th century, its been required by the government that genders should have separate “water closets.” Today this separation is second nature to us, we separate each other by our biological anatomy. The transgender community has been struggling trying to adjust to the ‘norm.’ Just recently more people have accepted the fact that transgenders exist in the world, they’ve started to be included in activities that were once not easy to get into. “School districts throughout the country have generally agreed to call transgender students by their preferred names and pronouns…allowed them to join the sports teams of the gender with which they identify.” But, trying figure out what bathroom to use is more difficult. This is because they feel compelled to making people feel more comfortable. Bazelzon uses examples that help reflect the difficulty. She uses a high-school student from Illinois as an example. Though the student has a government issued ID that identifies her female, her school district won’t allow her to change in the girls’ locker room they instead “send her to a separate room down the hall.” This breaks her rights and dehumanizes her, something a lot of people similar to her undergo. The word accommodate is important in the article because of how Bazelzon...

Uncovering New York’s ‘Ugly Truth’ truth Photography- A Tapestry of Space Summary

To completely understand “Tapestry of Space: Domestic Architecture and Underground communities in Margaret Morton’s Photography of a Forgotten New York” by Irina Nersessova you have to comprehend her primary and secondary research. Nersessova’s purpose in writing this complex analysis of public space in New York in the 1990s is to uncover the real New York architecturally and ultimately remember the forgotten. She does this by using her primary source, Margaret Morton and her photography, as a guide to reveal “the city as public space and tourist attraction, and the work and experience of domestic architecture” (Nersessova). Nersessova mentions the Situationist International or SI, which accounts for her secondary resource which helps support Morton’s photography. This organization helps support the reasoning behind why New York is the way it is. They are against images of illusion like advertisement because they tend to cover the squalor destitution, and they believe that the pictures have been manipulated and prevent people from distinguishing the reality. SI used psychogeography, which pertains to the emotion and tie a city has to a person or people, to explain their theory and belief of capitalism being a threat to humanity, Nersessova states that the pattern of New York and how its structured and built around attractions and tourists covers up the people surrounding the city. “Psychogeography thus produced a social geography of the city.” (Nersessova) The city being known for its tourism contributes to the homeless being overlooked. This ties into Morton’s photography because it reveals the ugly truth of the city and the forgotten people. In this article the words ‘flâneur’ and ‘dérive’ come up a...
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