Post-Gender Reading Summary

Metropolis Magazine / March 2015 / His & Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society His & Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society One of the United States’ leading textile designers argues for gender-neutral design as the next frontier in the workplace. Are we having a gender revolution?  People are confused or not confused by their a gender.  A superfluous statement that should mean absolutely nothing.  The contrary is the reality of today, sexual differentiation fading, literary speaking.  “The design landscape is still deeply rooted in Modernism.”  Modernism has historically been male dominated by male power roles. The article continues by identifying roles men and women have played in the modern world.  The significance is roles are changing, and women compete in roles that were dominated by males.  The complement to that is women are not only changing work roles but physically emulating males. The reaction of the male gender is to emulate females and enjoy their modern historical roles. clothes ” The time is ripe for designers to start questioning how they incorporate gender sensitivity into their work.” Children are the target of unisex clothing style design and promotion of the fashion trend-setting. Some school uniforms are uni-gender specific. Transgender people are included in the uni-gender garment industry development. The potential that people who are not confused about their sexual orientation will not choose to a simulate the clothing styles to make gender role playing less obvious. “In our post-gender world, masculine and feminine definitions are being switched and obscured. But this is an essentially human phenomenon, and we need to design for the accumulation of different human beings...

Reading Summary- Content Moderation (#6)

Photo from: www.instagramloginguide.com Better Online Living through Content Moderation The author of “Better Online Living through Content Moderation,” Melissa King, describes that the media needs to increase moderation and the ability to customize sites accordingly for the owner of the account. Many people have PTSD, thus unfiltered contents on the internet may cause harm to the person. It would only be fair for there to be more flexibility in preventing what is shown on the internet to limit the chances of having trauma. King first discusses computer-chair psychology and how exposure therapy can be more harmful than helpful. It can “inure an individual to these triggers and lesson the disruptions they can cause,” yet too much exposure may cause the patient to be even more traumatized. She then says that some think that the blocklists cause people to be defamed, however she thinks that blocking one another does not have the ability to “differentiate between the aggressor and their targets.” Online harassment is very dangerous, as people cannot always escape from the situation and cannot control the threats that force them into silence. Sexism is the last section in which King discusses. She says that PTSD is very common for women especially in a patriarchal society; women such as Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian shared their experiences of abuse. The author’s overall thought is that everyone should be able to control what is shown on the internet, and that blocking and modification should be...

Color Walking- A summary (#5)

Posted by: vi.sualize.us   The article, “Color Walking,” written by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan, is about an experiment that a teacher named William Burroughs designed to spark an idea for students to think about color. The students are surrounded by a huge variety of colors, thus Burroughs told the students to go outside and choose a color that would lead them from object to object. Interestingly, the objects may change from a purse to an ice cream cone within minutes. This allows the students to observe the details of the community and keep an open mind of how everything is designed. Bennin and McMullan gave a personal experience of an experiment held at “WNYC, in lower Manhattan, one Sunday afternoon.” At the end of the article, there was a suggestion to try the experiment. The authors said to pick a color as desired then make connections of the different colors from object to...

Reading Summary #6

In the article, Better Online Living through Content Moderation, Melissa King argues that the use of content control features benefit users by lessening the chance of negative responses to harmful or insulting content that may be seen online. Some examples of these controls are content/trigger warnings, block and ignore functions, blocklists, and privacy options (King, lines 1-2). The reason for these privacy precautions is to stop users from seeing content that may trigger PTSD, an anxiety attack, or other negative feelings. King describes these as valid reasons and goes on to state that, “In fact, there is no such thing as an invalid reason: nobody should be required to read or listen to content if they do not want to” (King, lines 7-9). Although content controls are a positive feature, there are some people that disagree. King allows readers to see these controls from the negative perspective, but provides a valid argument against opinions like these. Those who are against content controls often perceive users that utilize them as weak or over sensitive (King, lines 10-11). Situations in which users are being attacked or bothered by online aggressors are thought of as the victim’s problem instead of the antagonist’s doing. Others think these users should just toughen up and be less sensitive, which goes hand in hand with the Exposure Theory. This theory is designed to put a stop to anxiety by slowly exposing the subject to the source (King, lines 27-28). However, this theory does not come in handy when it comes to content controls. The Exposure Theory is all about controlled exposure; the Internet has no control...

The Color Life: Phia Bennin and Brenda McMullan Reading Summary

Radiolab bloggers Phia Bennin and Brenda McMullan put together a post describing how they came across the idea of a “color walk” and what this color walk did for the both of them. Photo retrieved from radiolab.com To start their post, Bennin and McMullan explained that they came across this “delightful idea” while working on a show that dealt with colors. They also explained how this idea was originally created.”Back in the day, William Burroughs dreamed up a tool to inspire his students: color walks” (paragraph two). Next they go on to describe what a color walk actually is.”Just walk out your door, pick a color that catches your eye, and watch your surroundings pop as you follow the color from object to object” (paragraph two). Following this description they give examples of their personal color walk and how it affected them. “We walked away seeing a world brimming over with colors”(paragraph three). At the end of the post they give readers instructions/ advice on how to conduct their own color walks. For example they suggest they you allow yourself to have a hour of “uninterrupted time” as well as letting the color of your choice guide you....

Color Walking Reading Summary

The article is about following colors that may catch your attention as you observe your surroundings. This was created by a man named William Burroughs, who did this to help his students learn about observing things to gain details and other such things that go along with observation. Someone in the near future decided to give this a try in New York City and was lead to  an array of different color that surrounded him/her. The author gives the reader some instructions at the end of their short anecdote on how they can g color walking wherever they may...
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