Some Summarizing Stuff: Can You Paint With All The Colors of the Wind?

In article Color Walking by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan the two carry out an experiment attributed to William Burroughs called color walking. The duo describe it as a pretty simplistic idea to call attention to the beautiful color within the normalcy we experience day to day: “Just walk out your door, pick a color that catches your eye, and watch your surroundings pop as you follow the color from object to object. While you walk, you’ll be struck by the red of a bicyclist’s shorts, the sunburn on a woman’s shoulders, the pealing paint on the fire hydrant” (Bennin, McMullan). The two authors used a method of color walking that allowed them to change which colors directed them where and embarked on their journey. Posting a digital map allowing the reader to interact with their color catalyzed journey, the audience can see what colors pulled them where. Lastly, we’re provided with several tips to help those who chose to embark on their own color journey: “Give yourself an hour of uninterrupted time, no commutes, no errands, just eye time. Pick a color, or let a color pick you–follow the one that makes your heart go thump-thump. If you get lost, pick another color. If you get really lost, you’re on the right track” (Bennin, McMullan). This listing of directions on how to color walk further acts as a mode of interaction with digital space for the audience in addition with the virtual mapping of the authors’ color walk. This multimodal aspect of the digital sphere is what connects the audience to the article and enables that learned from this article...

Reading Summary 6 Color Walking

In RadioLab’s article called “Color Walking” by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan, they encourage people to observe a specific color each day and see where it takes them. Going day by day, we tend to ignore the vibrant colors around us and do not notice how these colors can be connected to form the beautiful masterpiece that the world is. When people make a conscious effort to notice these colors and their connections, the world becomes a more interesting place and one’s perspective of their environment is subject to change. Sumner, Thomas. “Why Some Rainbows Are All Red.” Science News. N.p., 18 Dec. 2015. Web. 09 Mar. 2016. <https://www.sciencenews.org/article/why-some-rainbows-are-all-red>. In the podcast called “Color” by RadioLab, they discuss how the ability of sight is different in various species and even in different people. The majority of humans are trichromatic, meaning that they have three cones in order to see color: blue, green, and red. These three cones and the combination of them allow us to see millions of shades of colors. However, there are some women that are tetra chromatic, meaning that they have a yellow cone in addition to the other three cones.This is possible because women have an XX chromosome, so all women are born with the potential ability to have four active cones; although, in most women the fourth cone is not active. The interesting thing about this discovery of the active fourth cone is that these that tetra chromatic women can be found by doing a DNA test. However, when these women are found, few of them actually see the slight differences in colors that...

Color Walking by RadioLab (Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan)

Intro Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan describe how they came across an experiment from a previous show and decided to try it out themselves. Together, they take us through their experiment, known as a color walk. Color Walking | Color walks were created for people to draw inspiration from the world, and colors, around them. What is a color walk? Originally created as a tool to inspire his students, color walks were dreamed up by William Burroughs. Students were told to take a walk and focus on the colors they see.   How does a color walk work? The simplicity of the idea of color walks means anyone can try it. After walking out the door, you choose a color that pops out at you and continue on a walk paying attention to your surroundings. As you continue on your walk, your eyes will follow the pops of that color from one object to the next. Bennin and McMullan mention the decision to also allow the flexibility of switching from one color to another depending on what catches your eye. This way, it might be easier to let the colors get your attention when you find yourself searching for a pop of a certain color that is not there. “A woman’s lavender handbag might draw us to the right; a yellow cab could pull us down a side street; a green pistachio ice cream cone could shove us into the park” (RadioLab).   RadioLab’s Result After their walk, Bennin and McMullan describe their experience. Included in the article is a timeline of their color walk. Staying true to their claim...
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