Parables and Legends in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man

Image found here. Ralph Ellison wrote Invisible Man, a novel that refined the shape of American literature. This novel reflects America’s racial divide in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s through an anonymous black man’s journey (the narrator). Ellison uses an array of themes, motifs and symbols to get his message across. Throughout Invisible Man, Ellison also incorporates many parables and legends, important to the ultimate message. I would define parables as stories that teach a lesson and legends as how stories came to be. Below are a few examples of each. Example of Legends Story Behind the Narrator The narrator’s frame of mind and how he thinks he is what he was taught and raised to think, through his grandfather and his ideologies about the white man. The advice given by his grandfather is to fight back as hard as he can against people against blacks, even when he is gone he wants his grandson to keep fighting.(Ellison 16) “Let ’em swoller you till they vomit or bust wide open” “The narrator’s difficulty in leaving his past behind resonates throughout his story, from the recurring voice and image of his grandfather to the physical reminders of his past that he carries with him throughout the novel.” (Dykema-VanderArk) Jim Trueblood’s Story Trueblood tells his personal story to Mr. Norton and the narrator about his sexual encounter with his daughter. The narrator is disgusted with the incest, but since Mr. Norton (the white Trustee the narrator is watching over) is so interested the narrator has no choice. Trueblood later explains to the men how he was treated after the incident. He expressed...

Built Environment Annotated Bibliographies

Winne, Mark. “The Bluff.” The Bluff: Channel 2 Goes into Georgia’s Biggest Heroin Market. Web. 05 Feb. 2016.   In this article the author, discusses how Atlanta neighborhoods by the name of English Avenue and Vine City also known as ‘The Bluffs’, have been left in the dark for decades. English Avenue and Vine City have been the biggest drug neighborhoods in Georgia for many years. Many residents living here have been begging for the city of Atlanta to help, but promises continue to be broken leading to very few improvements within the community. A famous resident to this neighborhood was Martin Luther King Jr. The author describes how even when MLK lived there the neighborhood was still run down and a haven for heroine. Channel 2 investigative reporter Mark Winne walked around interviewing different residents and he talked to two men that said ‘The Bluffs’ was a neighborhood in which it is so easy to get caught up in the drug lifestyle and how that lifestyle more than likely always leads to death or prison time. Residents of this area this area are concerned that the city of Atlanta will continue to spend money on projects like the new Falcons stadium, but continue to forget about them. I chose this source because WSBTV is a credible source and it is right here in Atlanta where I am focusing my research on Atlanta Georgia. I enjoyed reading this article because it really shows how the city of Atlanta has indirectly contributed to the downfall of this neighborhood by simply not doing anything. Mártir, Vanessa. “Gentrified Brooklyn Is Not My...

We should open our minds and listen before we speak…

What I’ve learned strictly from being in a public school system is that physical attributes such as my age, my race, and my gender plays a role in how I am perceived. I’ve always heard the term “racism” thrown around as an annoyance to the majority of people. But to me, it is my life, how I am perceived, and how my voice is heard. The recent deaths of John Crawford, Renisha McBride, Eric Garner, Michael Brown and many others not publicized have led to increasing mistrust between black Americans in communities and police and the criminal justice system. Blacks, as I, feel as if their voices are consistently muted; when we talk about racism and discrimination, we are told “we are making it about race”, as if our identities and how we are seen in society are just cards we can take out and put away. This was especially made clear to me in the past few months. One of my teachers in high school liked talking about current events in the news every day before class. One day he took the time to inform the class about the Michael Brown shooting for those who weren’t aware or caught up. After summarizing the events of the shooting, he concluded that Michael Brown deserved what he got and the lack of indictment was just. The feeling of disappointment I felt as one of four black students in the room was indescribable. I was not upset that he had a differing opinion from mine; I was upset that he as a figure of authority and a trusted educator presented a...

The Atlanta Beltline’s Potential to Increase Racial Inequality

Jacob, Brown. “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline.” Emory University, 2013. Web. In his thesis “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline”,  Jacob Brown a student of the London School of Economics at Emory University, discusses the ” spatial dimensions of racial inequality” (3) that exist in Atlanta. In particular he examines the Beltline and “interrogates its broader potential to act as an agent of racial equity” (4). Brown notes that while the Beltline contributes green and art spaces and “connect Atlanta’s neighborhoods through multi-use trails and rail transit” (4) it can also have a “potential effect on Atlanta’s racial inequality” (4). Other projects such as the Olympic Park, Turner Field, Underground Atlanta and Omni International (5) claimed to solve issues similar to those addressed with the Beltline. However, these projects have all led to displaced impoverished black communities. Brown suggests because the Beltline shares characterisitcs of these projects and “how race affected these developments, and vice versa, indicates the Beltline’s potential relationship with racial equity” (7).  Northeast Beltline (Author’s Own) This source is useful for researchers because it shows how Atlanta’s environment is built to enhance disparities between  its “wealthy White north side”and “poor Black south side” and how this impact weakens social connections between neighborhoods. In the case of the Beltline the development appears to be beneficial providing “small businesses along the pedestrian trails, residential developments, art installations and parks” (10). However, this small improvement is overshadowed by inequalities. The Beltline rail is designed in a way that “divide neighborhoods and constrain intra-neighborhood connections” (16) leading to social exclusion due to lack of transportation. The purpose of this source is...

Annotated Bibliography 8 : Stars Flock to Atlanta

Panoramic from carrollmorgan.com Severson, Kim. “Stars Flock to Atlanta, Reshaping a Center of Black Culture.” Nytimes.com. The New York Times Company, 25 Nov. 2011. Web. 27 Mar. 2016.   In her article “Stars Flock to Atlanta, Reshaping a Center of Black Culture”, Kim Severson, from The New York Times, claims that Atlanta “is emerging as an epicenter of the black glitterati”. To support her claim she begins with talking about the Soul Train Awards being hosted in the Fox Theater and how “a few years ago, the city probably would not have been able to pull off such a show”. She provides statements from Stephen Hill, an executive vice President for BET where he gives his opinion of Atlanta. He says that ” it’s so ripe with African American flavor and talent”. He also says “Atlanta is home to our core audience” and “Atlanta is our New York, our LA”. Then Severson gives examples of successful black people in the industry who have homes or business in Atlanta such ass, Tyler Perry, Sean Combs, Ce L Green, Ludacris, and Gladys Knight. She explains the Entertainment Industry Investment Act passed in 2008, “which gives qualified productions a 20 percent tax break” and “producers who embed the Georgia promotional logo in the titles or credits can take another 10 percent off the tax bill”. Next, she discusses the “decade of migration of black [stars] from the North”. Some of the reasons behind this is cheaper living and lower production costs. Severson provides a statement from Warrington Hudlin, president of the Black Filmmaker Foundation in New York, where he claims that” Atlanta...
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