Bibliographic Annotation 4 and 5

Bibliographic Annotation #4: Where It All Went Wrong Monroe, Doug. “Where It All Went Wrong.” Atlanta 52.4 (2012): 86-98. Master FILE. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. This article is a concise article that takes you through a vision of MARTA from its early creation, struggles it had with funding and to where it is now is at. The article gives great insight into the struggles the lack of a proper public transit system is doing for Atlanta as a city. For example, on page 96, Christopher B. Leinberger, a professor at Georgetown who has watched Atlanta rise and fall, clearly states that our cities biggest failure was not allowing the public transit to thrive within the limits and perpetually connect our city. This article was completely valid to the topic of rhetoric in the built environment; because it demonstrates the struggles Atlanta has with its inability to attract a new workforce due to our mediocre transit system.  I have found no flaws in this article; it connects our lack of a proper built environment and even connects the dots on the racial struggles that the city faced while the development of our public transit system. I believe it could have been more relevant, since it is nearly 4 years old and we have been pushing leaps and bounds since then to advance our system, but the information provided was a direct link to the struggles Atlanta’s Public transit has on connecting users from throughout the state in a cohesive manner.   Bibliographic Annotation #5: “Making Marta… Cool?” Burns, Rebecca. “Making Marta… Cool?” Atlanta 54.10 (2015): 17-20. MasterFILE Elite. Web. 19...

Annotated Bibliography Entry 5: Impacts of Our Built Environment on Public Health

Entry #5 Dearry, Allen. “Editorial: Impacts of Our Built Environment on Public Health.” Environmental Health Perspectives 112.11 (2004): A600–A601. Print. In his editorial, Allen Dearry points out that we spend 90% of our lives indoors, yet we do not know much about our own built environments.  This is partially due to the fact that modern architecture and building techniques change more often than nature does.  And with the changes we make to the way we structure our environment we in turn damage the Earth.  Habitat loss and declining water resources are just some of the self-inflicted environmental problems we face today.  He also explains that we are building more roads to account for more drivers which also equates to more car accidents.  Not to mention the greenhouse gases we emit from our vehicles that in turn hurt the planet and ourselves.  And finally he addresses the most deadly of all the health risks we face due to the higher levels of industry we subject ourselves to: obesity.  The more urban our communities get, the less we walk and ride bikes.  The more we sit in cars, offices, and movie theaters, the less we are exercising.  These are all dangers that stem from a less-natural environment.  Dearry’s writing is very relevant to our current realm of study and very useful as he offers a new, more pessimistic viewpoint on the...
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