Public Spaces: Atlanta’s Struggle with Accommodation and Integration

When walking through the streets and other public spaces in Atlanta, you wouldn’t think twice about the acceptance and accommodation you have as a member of the ‘general’ public where all the public spaces are designed with you in mind. But what happens to the groups of people who look through the same spaces and see a clear lack of representation and compassion to have the same opportunities? Do they have to view this act as a deliberate move to push them out of the same society or see it as the society blatantly turning a blind eye to their different needs? When addressing Atlanta’s public space, we also have to understand the society’s need to integrate and assimilate the tangential groups into the general masses. The issues brought up within these groups are not about their change of identity but the acceptance of their different identity into the norm of the culture. This normative change would ultimately result in the accommodation into the public space. Regardless of the intention, we as the public have to delve into Atlanta’s public spaces and see why there is this lack of accommodation as well as think pragmatically to come to a clear revision of the public spaces in Atlanta. We see the people who are targeted against in Atlanta’s public spaces are the one’s who are vastly different from the general population. For example, we see Atlanta not accommodating to the Disabled, Transgender, or Homeless by creating a built environment that goes against their own opportunity to enjoy the public space. Schindler talks about this type of exclusion in her article...
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