Color Walking Reading Summary

    William S. Burroughs This article describes an activity called “Color Walking”. The two authors, Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan, credit the author William Burroughs with the creation of the concept in order to help his students to better analyze the world around them. This added an interesting new side to the article because, while I haven’t read any of Burroughs’ works, I have been reading a lot of  Jack Kerouac lately and Burroughs was a major player in the beat poet scene and plays a large part in On The Road . Kerouac even describes him as the “greatest satirical writer since Jonathan Swift“. The basic idea behind a color walk is to set aside a period of time and walk down the street looking for everything of a specific color and follow these things wherever they lead you. The things themselves could be anything; cars, clothing, buildings, etc.. to better allow participants to stay engage, the article suggest that one switch the color they’re searching for periodically when the one that they’re using becomes stale. The purpose of this article, as I interpreted it, was not to describe the activity in detail or analyze it but to give a brief description and set of instructions so that the readers can try it out for themselves. I almost saw it more as a manual than an article. The instructions given for a Color Walk are as follows: Give yourself an hour of uninterrupted time, no commutes, no errands, just eye time. Pick a color, or let a color pick you–follow the one that makes your heart go thump-thump. If...

Reading Summary #6

Color Walking” “Color Walking”, is an article written by Phia Bennin and Brendan Mcmullan on June 29, 2012. In the beginning of the article, they talk about a tool dreamed up by Williams Burroughs to inspire his students. It involved the process of just walking out of the door, picking a color that catches your eye and while you walk just notice the objects that you come across with that same color; red bicyclist’s shorts, woman’s sunburned shoulders, and the paint on a fire hydrant. See simple enough right. They even decided to go a little further by using more than one color and letting your eyes bounce from object to object, color to color. They began their walk in WNYC, located in lower Manhattan. They started their walk out the revolving doors introducing their eyes to their first color, blue, which led them to a woman wearing a scarf, then a girl with chipped nail polish, which then almost led then on the subway but being distracted by the blues led them in another way, on the blue basketball courts. After being distracted by the blues and basketball, they started on their second color, somehow they set their eyes on purple and not long after pink, a purple shirt drew them in first, worn by someone with sparkly eyes, which led them to leopard legs and then leopard legs and “legalize gay”  at an outdoor café, a man in pink. This walk lasted them from 4:09p.m. to 4:23p.m. They talk about how they walked away from the experiment not only seeing the colors of the world but being...

Reading Summary #5

The article, Color Walking, by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan focuses on an interesting experiment that illuminates the world of color and how people see it, or more so how they do not see it. Color is a part of our daily lives and if we are not careful, we can become numb to it. Teacher William Burroughs created color walking. Burroughs first introduced color walking to his student as a way to inspire them (Bennin and McMullan, lines 3-4). This simple activity has ended up inspiring the authors of this article and many others by opening their eyes to the world of color. Color walking is simple: walk outside, pick a color, and follow that color by allowing your eyes to bounce from object to object (Bennin and McMullan, lines 5-7). On their advice on how to color walk, the authors note, “If you get lost, pick another color. If you get really lost, you’re on the right track” (Bennin and McMullan, line 22). In the article, readers follow the authors around the city of Manhattan as they feast their eyes upon the wonders of color: a blue scarf, blue at the basketball courts, a purple shirt, and hues of pink. The article provides photos and a timeline of their afternoon spent color walking (a screenshot of this is presented below). At the end of the experiment, the vividness and attention to color stayed in the minds of the authors, “We walked away seeing a world brimming over with colors” (Bennin and McMullan, lines 15-16). At the end of the article, advice is given on how readers can...

Reading Summaries 5 & 6

King, Melissa. “Better Online Living through Content Moderation.” Model View Culture. 14 Oct. 15. Web. 07 Mar. 2016. This article shows us the relationship between PTSD and content control. Some people have argued that PTSD is only associated with those who have been in the military, but they are mistaken. Individuals who have been affected by bullying can also experience PTSD, and this is where content control comes into play. Melissa King lets us know that content control is referring to “block and ignore functions, content/trigger warnings, blocklists and privacy options.” These features aid people who may risk triggering their anxiety from unwanted content on the Internet. These same individuals get criticized and are told to “just deal with it” when it comes to online abuse and unwanted content. Content control has become a very helpful solution to this new internet problem. “Content control is helpful in limiting the worst of these attacks, which themselves can cause PTSD if severe or long-term enough. While using content control features is not guaranteed to stop the effects of abuse, they do help and their use should not be disparaged and discouraged.” Bennin, Phia, and Brendan McMullen. “Color Walking.” Radiolab Blogland. 29 June 2012. Web. 07 Mar. 2016. http://www.radiolab.org/story/214709-color-walk/ Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullen introduce us to this new idea of “Color Walking.” You simply walk out the door, let a color catch your eye, and follow it for as long as you can, or until another color excites you. The main idea is to follow one object to the next with similar colors, and get “lost” along the way. Let yourself...

Strolling Around Using Color As a Source of Navigation

Example of a person “color walking” Phia Bennin and Brendan Mcmullan decided to initiate an experiment called “color walking.” This idea was found through a blog post about a man named William Burroughs who wanted to ” inspire his students” ( Bennin and Mcmullan par. 2). The experiment is actually pretty simple. You would have to “walk out your door, pick a color that catches your eye, and watch your surroundings pop as you follow the color from object to object” ( Bennin and Mcmullan par. 2). On a Sunday, the authors attempted this experiment starting from the location in lower Manhattan. The first color they initiated with was blue with objects like a scarf, and a basketball court which later led to purple “leopard legs.” The walk ended with the color...
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