Annotated Bibliography 7, 8, 9, and 10 (Accommodation, Sustainability, and Art)

Wheatley, Thomas. “Vandals and Taggers, Beware.” Creative Loafing. 5 May 2011. Web. 25 Apr. 2016. <http://clatl.com/atlanta/atlantas-graffiti-task-force-begins-investigating-removing-vandalism/Content?oid=3161169>. The article already sets a a narrow perspective of the Atlanta citizens’ perspective on the growing street art. Looking at my other piece on the street art of Atlanta, you can see another perspective on the graffiti ‘problem’ in Atlanta. However, the article also talks about the other side of graffiti and how they intend not to stifle the creative process as well as differentiate street art from vandalism. The article also speaks about how the local artists of Atlanta think that more commissioned murals would help curb the vandalism problem plaguing Atlanta’s walls. The article talks about how the Atlanta Police Department and how they set up a new task force to crack down on the removal and prosecution of street artists. While talking to the authorities implementing the task force, the article also includes the viewpoint that the street artists have on this new task force and what the repercussions could be in instilling a punishment to the ‘artists “Feds Outline Concerns over Atlanta Streetcar in Stern Letter.” AJC.com: Atlanta News, Sports, Atlanta Weather, Business News. 29 Sept. 2015. Web. 25 Apr. 2016. <http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local-govt-politics/feds-outline-concerns-over-atlanta-streetcar-in-st/nnq4g/>. In the article, the Feds have expressed a warning to both the mayor and MARTA chief over the safety and management concerns over the function of the Atlanta Streetcar. In the letter, the Feds worry over the lack of preparation, lack of proper maintenance, underdeveloped operating systems, and safety report issues. All these issues seem to be met with passivity from Atlanta and Marta by saying that...

Annotated Bibliographies 1-5

Project topic: 10 Issues Our Youth Face Today Annotated Bibliography 1 Mom Story: My kids have life-threatening food allergies by Julie Weingarden Dubin written on December 31,2013 is a article that specifically talks about a mom’s experience of handling children with food allergies. Jake was born with a weak immune system and as a mother, Ourman took the urge to quit her job and to take care of her son. Later on, she figured out that her son was allergic to peanuts and also had wheezing. Dubin used Ourman to show how she took initiative to help work around her children’s dietary restrictions and still enjoy eating food. Dubin is sending out a message to her readers saying that people should use what they have and grow on how they can better the community even in the smallest way possible. She also took responsibility in educating herself on this issue so as to be more prepared in the future. I chose this source because I can relate to this problem. I am lactose intolerant and up to this day I still struggle with taking care of myself. Allergies are something that shouldn’t be used to define someone. Instead they should be used as an indicator to show that this person is strong enough to face the most hardest phase in their life.The article’s relevance to the project topic encounters one part of their life where they are not being defined for what they do not control. Instead of viewing food allergies to be something negative, they are avoided or alternatives are used for the individual to grow. This article is mainly directed to...

Annotated Bibliography Eleven (Obesity, Poverty, and The Built Environment)

Perdue, Wendy Collins. “Obesity, Poverty, and The Built Environment.” University of Richmond. University of Richmond, 2008. Web. 12 Apr. 2016. In this scholarly article titled Obesity, Poverty, and The Built Environment Wendy Collins Perdue interacts with the idea that the built environment contributes to obesity, especially those found in poorer neighborhoods. One example the article mentions is poorer neighborhoods tend to have a greater number of fast-food restaurants and convenience stores instead of super-markets that sell healthier and more varied food. A second example is people living in poorer neighbors may be discouraged from walking or visiting a park due to crime or degraded infrastructure (e.g. sidewalks). That’s assuming there are any parks or recreational areas. Typically, it’s less likely a poorer area would have a place where people can play sports, picnic, hike, bike, etc. According to the article, the solution is to educate ourselves and others about how the built environment can influence health while working with experts and designers to slowly change the built environment into a more health-friendly...

Annotated Bibliography #8

mlamar2 [Mark Lamar]. “Annotated Bibliography Entry 5: Impacts of Our Built Environment on Public Health.” mlamar2’s Blog. 20 Feb. 2016. Web. 23 March 2016. The Summary and Evidence The blog post by Mark Lamar is an annotated bibliography that describes the impact of the built environment on public health. Lamar describes an article by Allen Dearry that addresses environmental problems and health problems caused by the built environment. Lamar talks about how urban communities can contribute to obesity because of the use of cars. He also talks about how enjoying the luxuries that come with modern cities lead to less exercise. Since Atlanta is a modern city, this can relate directly to it. The over abundance of cars can lead to obesity. Found at: http://media.cmgdigital.com/shared/img/photos/2013/03/29/f5/9a/033013_weekend_traffic.JPG Why This Source? I chose this source because it provides more info on my chosen topic of health and the built environment. It provides me with another source to utilize when researching my topic. Flaws/Weaknesses A flaw this source has is the fact that it is not a scholarly source. Since it is a blog post, there is no one to moderate or verify the info in the blog post. How is it related? The source provides me with another source, and it gives more information on my research topic.  ...
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