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In Better Online Living through Content Moderation, Melissa King argues that digital environments on the internet have the necessity to accommodate users with the option to block certain sources that cause stress. The action of blocking has become a subject that is ridiculed instead of fully accepted because some claim that people should experience all of the internet and be exposed to the media in its fullest. Those who claim such an idea are indirectly stating that every person on the internet is the same, and are capable of handling all of its content. However, no internet user is the same and not every person can handle stress well. Instead of forcing internet users that suffer from stress caused by online environments to completely abandon internet use—which is nearly impossible in society today—the utilization of blocklists should be encouraged, and not criticized. PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), in popular culture, is often associated with veterans, however digital spaces, as well as a variety of other sources, can very well cause the disorder to appear (King). Bullying is an issue that several people face in any social environment and “the fact is, long-term exposure to threatening situations, such as online harassment, is one of the major causes of PTSD” (King). There comes plenty anxiety if a person is exposed to topics or situations that cause him/her discomfort of some sort. The information and social topics discussed on the internet can also trigger stress from past situations, if not cause initial stress to occur. High levels of stress are not healthy for any person, whatever the source is. It should not be...

The CDC Has a Museum?

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is a major global organization based in Atlanta near Emory University, if not a part of the campus. Apart from being a significant public health facility, there is a museum within the gated community that is free and open to the public according to the website. That claim is questionable in that once entering the facility, visitors are required to present an ID to security. Visitors have a limit of how far they can travel within the building. The museum is located right within the lobby area where visitors can be easily monitored by employees. The area is greatly spatial and lacks furniture which crafts minimalistic appeal that aligns well with the modern, science-orientated theme of the space. The appearance of lobby is dominated by the color white–white tiled floors, white walls, white pillars, white desks. Apart from white, the space is heavily designed with lustrous metal that reflects like mirrors and includes a large surface area of windows. The natural lighting mixed with the fluorescent lighting in the lobby accentuate the brightness of the pale, neutral color theme. These aspects emphasize the cleanliness of the facility. The simplicity within that color scheme creates a modern minimalistic vibe. The museum, however, portrays a different mood. The floors are carpeted, and apart from the natural lighting that is still present, the area has warm lighting. The museum utilizes a variety of colors instead of sticking to neutrals. This gives the impression of artistic freedom and diverse environment. The variety in color, as well as in presentation of projects, functions to capture the attention...

Annotated Bibliography Entries 4, 5, 6

Ezuma, Tiffany. Top 10 Must-Visit Cities around the World. watchmojo.com, 2014. http://watchmojo.com/video/id/13277. In this video scripted by Tiffany Ezuma, watchmojo.com exhibits the Top 10 Must-Visit Cities around the World by evaluating what spaces have the most exciting and enlightening attractions for tourists, and thus also advertising these environments. The video is directed towards individuals who are interested in international travel for leisure. Ezuma explains the grounds in which the cities are recognizable for their ability to attract visitors: “how beautiful they are, how fun they are and how much they have to offer tourists in the way of cuisine, must-see attractions and overall vibe.” The ten cities that are shown in the video are Berlin, Barcelona, Tokyo, Amsterdam, Rome, Istanbul, Shanghai, London, New York City, and Paris. From these cities, the watcher may notice the fact that most of them are western civilizations which implies that the experience economy is already well established within western areas of the world. In each description of the city, Ezuma mentions distinctive features of each space, and almost all of the descriptions are revolved around the idea of cultural history being intertwined within the modern city environment embellished with forms of entertainment—the same idea addressed in Gitte, Jensons, and Kiib’s “The Experience City: Planning of Hybrid Cultural Projects.” This video captures all the pleasing aspects of the societies to advertise tourism in order to inevitably give the environments an economic boost. This video functions as evidence to the idea of globalization and the experience economy. Li, Mimi, et al. “A Grid-Group Analysis of Tourism Motivation.” International Journal of Tourism Research 17.1 (2015): 35-44....
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