Built Environment Analysis Outline

The building of the experience economy through recreational/tourist attractions in Atlanta has caused economic growth, an increase in diversity, and an increase in tourism. I. Intro a. What is an experience economy? b. Disneyfication c. What caused the experience economy to spread globally? d. When does Atlanta most evidently begin to build up its experience economy? II. The Symbolic Effect of the Economy a. Present commonly known pieces of architecture, or spaces whether natural or man-made, around the world. (i.e. Eiffel Tower, Grand Canyon, Great Wall, Niagara Falls) b. Elaborate on how the pieces function not only to make places distinctive, but also function as symbols for experience economies found in certain regions as tactics to promote tourism. c. Transition into symbols found in Atlanta like the Georgia Aquarium, the World of Coca-Cola, the CDC, King Memorial/Civil Rights District III. The Promotion of Recreational Spending through City Design a. Limited and paid parking promotes an increase of walkers and public transportation in Atlanta. b. Provide a brief explanation of Marta. Explain more so on the Atlanta Streetcar that was recently established. c. Peachtree Street extends through many of Atlanta’s attractions. d. How walkable is Atlanta? IV. Demographic Changes in Atlanta a. Present census statistics–increase in some racial groups and gentrification within black community b. Globalization in the environment c. Accommodation in the environment (relates to walkability, public transit) V. Conclusion a. Draw conclusions and connect the evidence presented to support the...

Underwater Experience at the Georgia Aquarium

                    The Georgia Aquarium is all about experience. The space heavily relies on visual to capture its audience, but also integrates other forms of interaction. In order to invite visitors, the space is made to be comfortable for those occupy it. Before an environment can truly be comfortable, it must provide accommodation. Therefore, through the way the aquarium accommodates its guests imply the types of people it was established for. A space built for experience, however, cannot succeed simply through accommodation, but also through capturing and engaging its visitors. The interior of the Georgia Aquarium convincingly demonstrates this phenomenon. The photo on the far left displays a tank that greatly exceeds the limits of the picture frame. The picture is filled with the color blue which imitates an ocean. The space allows the guests to be surrounded by a deep hue of blue which should make them feel as though they are intertwined with the underwater life. This visual effect not only gives an impression of how vast the ocean is, but also involves the visitors as they comfortably sit on the carpeted floors and gaze into everything the tank–the living movie screen–has to offer. The visual experience that this room provides is highly effective. The adjacent image shown in the middle demonstrates a tangible experience the aquarium offers. The tank is uncovered, leveled at a personal height, and has a sign above it that invites guests to feel the starfish inside the tank using two fingers. Within the frame of the picture, there are two youthful-looking hands on the stone surrounding...

Making Atlanta “Fun”

This website functions to promote visitors and possibly residents of Atlanta to take trips to the areas where Atlanta has prepared for their arrival. This is shown in the home page. In the above picture, the title reads “50 Ways to Experience Atlanta” which directly and obviously relates to the experience economy in Atlanta. This item proves that Atlanta is attempting to display that Atlanta offers various experiences for those who seek the town for recreational reasons. Behind the title, there is an image of a crowded Centennial Park with several children enjoying themselves in the water. The image is very appealing to families. Underneath are subcategories: “50 Fun Thing to Do,” “Hotel Packages,” “Dining in Atlanta,” “What’s Hot.” More than appealing to current residents, this website appears to be a tourist’s guide....

Annotated Bibliography

  Marling, Gitte, Ole B. Jensen, and Hans Kiib. “The Experience City: Planning of Hybrid Cultural Projects.” European Planning Studies 17.6 (2009): 863. Advanced Placement Source. Web. 4 Feb. 2016 This article revolves around a recent and current form of economy that is fueled by competition among regions: experience economy. This term symbolizes the idea of regions creating attractions for residents and tourists. The authors, through examples of Emscher Park, Barcelona, Graz, and Denmark, explain how several industrial or historic facilities get renovations in order to create a public place to appeal to either all crowds, or particular demographics, for “learning and playing” (869). Around the 1980s to 1990s, regions increasingly took interest into the image of spaces in order to demonstrate a high quality of living that would attract visitors and their money. With this, also, countries become increasingly diversified—if a region is competitive enough to accept strangers for the economic growth of the city. It is a common trend among people to seek leisure or new experiences, and that is why the market through an experience city is plenty successful. The article is easy to read, well organized, and reasonable in length. Through examples and analysis, the authors address a modern economy in architecture and how it effects, and is effected by, humanities.   Lees, Loretta. “The Geography of Gentrification: Thinking Through Comparative Urbanism.” Progress in Human Geography 36.2 (2012): 155. Advanced Placement Source. Web. 5 Feb. 2016 In this article, Lees presents a call-to-action for the awareness of global gentrification. The author criticizes the idea of urbanization which was given a positive connotation though the wealthy...
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