Reading Summaries 5 & 6

King, Melissa. “Better Online Living through Content Moderation.” Model View Culture. 14 Oct. 15. Web. 07 Mar. 2016. This article shows us the relationship between PTSD and content control. Some people have argued that PTSD is only associated with those who have been in the military, but they are mistaken. Individuals who have been affected by bullying can also experience PTSD, and this is where content control comes into play. Melissa King lets us know that content control is referring to “block and ignore functions, content/trigger warnings, blocklists and privacy options.” These features aid people who may risk triggering their anxiety from unwanted content on the Internet. These same individuals get criticized and are told to “just deal with it” when it comes to online abuse and unwanted content. Content control has become a very helpful solution to this new internet problem. “Content control is helpful in limiting the worst of these attacks, which themselves can cause PTSD if severe or long-term enough. While using content control features is not guaranteed to stop the effects of abuse, they do help and their use should not be disparaged and discouraged.” Bennin, Phia, and Brendan McMullen. “Color Walking.” Radiolab Blogland. 29 June 2012. Web. 07 Mar. 2016. http://www.radiolab.org/story/214709-color-walk/ Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullen introduce us to this new idea of “Color Walking.” You simply walk out the door, let a color catch your eye, and follow it for as long as you can, or until another color excites you. The main idea is to follow one object to the next with similar colors, and get “lost” along the way. Let yourself...

Annotated Bibliography Two

This is the image of the homeless man and women being evicted from their tents in Wooduff Park in Downtown, Atlanta.   Childress, Sarah, et al. “Mental Illness And Substance Use Problems In Relation To Homelessness Onset.” American Journal Of Health Behavior 39.4 (2015): 549-555 7p. CINAHL Plus with Full Text. Web. 23 Feb. 2016.   In the article, “Mental Illness and Substance Use Problems In Relations To Homelessness Onset”, author, Sarah Childress discusses the association between mental illness, substance use, and homelessness. Childress Childress’ article studied 394 homeless adults and gathered a plethora of statistical evidence to establish a relationship. The study took place in Dallas, Texas and was comprised of random homeless men and women who saw the flyers and wanted to participate. However, the criteria they were required to meet were that they must be at least 18 years old, English-speaking, and have a 7th grade literacy level. Of the participants that Childress studied, 124 of them reported you-onset homelessness. The homeless youth reported “using substances to attenuate the negative psychological effects of living on the streets, to reduce depressive symptoms, and to stay awake when they experience difficulty finding a safe place to sleep” (Childress, 550). A problem that Childress remarked was how the youth tend to be less likely to seek help, thus face the same or worsened drug and psychological problems into adulthood. Based on the mental illness related statistics that Childress obtained, “64.7% of the sample reported a major depression diagnosis, 41.1% a bipolar disorder diagnosis, and 25.4% schizophrenia or a schizoaffective disorder diagnosis at some point over the lifetime” (Childress, 551)....
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