Reading Summary 6

In the article, Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments, by Mary Hocks gives information about rhetoric found in digital writing environments. She explains how teachers can teach their students to write about the visual rhetoric in digital environments. Hocks introduces the subject of the digital writing environment by stating that in this current period of time the prevalence interactive media is increasing as a result visual rhetoric has become critical when writing. Digital writing involves mixing together words and visuals. Hock refers to this type of writing as a hybrid of “verbal, spatial and visual”. Hybrid literacy employs a complex interaction between verbal and visual meanings. Because of this new relationship of rhetoric, changes must be made to supplement for this new definition of writing. Teachers who in the past taught rhetoric in print are now having to try teaching their students visual rhetoric. Hocks goes on to describe some key feature of digital rhetoric by analyzing two scholarly essays by Anne Wysocki and Christine Boese. She introduces the terms audience stance, transparency, and hybridity. Hock defines audience stance to be the encouraging or discouraging of interactivity from audience created by the author, examples of diferent ways this can be utilized are shown in Wysocki’s hypertext. Transparency is defined as how an online document organizes and establishes conventions like print, graphic design, film, and web pages; that make it clear and familiar to a reader, example Wysocki’s hypertext is given showing how easy the reader can navigate through the text. Hybridity is the ways in which online documents combine and construct visual and verbal designs, once again Hocks...

Reading Summary #5

Hocks, Mary. “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments,” College Composition and Communication 54.4 (2003): pp. 629-656.   Hocks discusses two major topics in her article. The first thing she defines 3 key terms using two hypertexts, composed by Anne Wysocki and Christine Boese. She also discusses how these 3 terms are elements of work produced by students. She has a few major points she makes, but her main point is that visual rhetoric is a “transformative process of design” (645). Her other points include using a digital writing environment can help us become newly aware of classic principles of rhetoric but also help us to develop a new way of teaching writing as design. The three terms she discusses are audience stance, transparency, and hybridity. She uses these words throughout her article to discuss these two hypertexts. She defines audience stance as the interaction of the audience the online piece of writing, it includes the Aristotelian principle of ethos. The author of the online document can invite or reject audience interaction. Transparency refers to the way in which the online writing resembles culturally familiar scenes with their own convention. These include print, graphic, design, film and web pages. Hybridity refers to the ways online writing mingles visual and verbal elements in its overall presentation. Hocks does an analysis of how these terms can be seen in the two hypertexts. She discusses how Wysocki’s essay helps grasp the histories of design. She also discusses how in Christine Boese essay displays the three aspects of digital media. She continues to compare both articles based on the three aspects of digital...
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