Architectural Roadblocks Within The Classroom

Reading Summary #6 Transform, Interact, Learn, Engage; it sounds so familiar to us nowadays, because those are words that are being used so freely to describe our society’s necessity to adapt and move forward in our way of thinking and teaching. Transform, Interact, Learn and Engage; or better known as, “TILE”. It is a an acronym used to discuss the forward thinking and innovative learning centers being placed within the University of Iowa’s Campus’. Nowadays, everyone is looking for new ways to learn faster and gather information quicker than the person to their left or right. This has forced the world to adapt and start thinking of alternative learning styles that can help the new generation of students learn how they are meant to learn. The traditional class room was a blockade to the built environment of our classroom and required restructure for us to excel to our fullest potential. I mean, let’s be honest, how well do you pay attention in a classroom like this?   In this Journal of Learning Space, Vol 1, No 2; Sam Van Horne describes this necessity and backs up his claims based on factual evidence. Page 2, paragraph 2, he describes how even the size of the table made for the room is not by accident. In their findings, a table that is smaller than 7 feet would make students cramped but a table larger would promote table wide discussions. They were able to determine that a 7 foot wide table was the perfect size in diameter for promotion of collaboration and appropriate level of conversations. In a day in age, where...

A New Revolution of Learning, a Summary of “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments”

The era of paper and pen style writing is beginning to decline as technology is advancing. Writing styles are beginning to evolve, taking a more modern shape and allowing writing to incorporate images, audience interaction and sounds, something absent in paper and pen writing. In her paper “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments“, Mary E. Hocks discusses this evolution and the incorporation of digital documents in writing. Hocks divides her paper into two sections with one section using two academic hypertextual essays to help explain the visual digital rhetoric and the other section discussing how teachers should incorporate visual digital rhetoric in their teaching. In addition to this, she also divides the visual digital rhetoric into three categories: Audience stance, transparency and hybridity. The audience stance is the way the author creates ethos and the degree of audience participation. Transparency is how familiar the terminology and concepts of the article is to the audience. Lastly, hybridity is how the site combines images and texts. Hocks begins by examining the first academic hypertextual essay, “Monitoring Order” by Anne Wysocki. The first thing Hocks points out is how Wysocki promotes audience participation by providing interactive text and images, allowing the audience to progress through the essay in an order that they chose. As a result, the essay promotes active reading and decreases attention fatigue, something that all too common with long academic articles or papers. The saying “A picture is worth a million words” is beginning to be proven in the modern day style of writing (bloging etc). Sourced from Transformation Marketing The second thing Hocks discusses is how Wysocki establishes transparency by using a familiar format, colors and...

Reading Summary 3: Recognizing Campuses as Learning Spaces

Kathleen G Scholl and Gowri Betrabet Gulwadi discuss the often understated importance of college environments in their writing, “Recognizing Campus Landscapes as Learning Spaces.”  Firstly, they frame their message by outlining the scene of colleges in America today.  The number of students in college in the U.S.A. is higher than ever before, and with high enrollment rates there are high expectations for the learning environment.  The authors insist that we already have an image of what a college campus should look like in our mind.  However, why does the ideal campus look the way it does?  Is there any real purpose for having campuses in a seemingly secluded small town with only the college itself driving the local economy? Due to the notion that learning is a process that never goes on summer break or takes the weekend off, an institute of higher learning should promote learning in areas outside of the classroom.  Especially since most of the students’ time is spent outside of class anyway.  Today’s generation of youth is defined by a culture of multitasking and the quick spread of information.  While society demands a large amount of attention, college demands even more, creating a very dynamic lifestyle for the college student of the 2010’s.  That reality is one of the main reasons why a calm, relaxed college setting is imperative.  The school environment is most effective in helping the student succeed when it provides a refuge from the normal level of attention that usually is required from the student.  According to studies, campuses that are more natural and incorporate nature into the daily sights visible by...
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