Better Online Living Through Content Moderation by Melissa King

Intro Content control features are useful for many situations in which people choose to limit or filter what they see online. These features are helpful to those who are victims of PTSD, violent threats, and other negative online experiences. In her article, Melissa King discusses the view of people who oppose the use of content control and how their claim that those who use it are simply too weak or sensitive is actually creating a culture that puts even more pressure and self-blame on these victims. Against Content Control The foremost argument against the use of content control is that people make out their online experience of harassment to be worse than it is because they are extra sensitive. This viewpoint compares unrestricted Internet exposure, without content control, to exposure therapy- “a type of therapy designed to combat severe anxiety” (King). The issue with this comparison is that it is not entirely accurate. Exposure therapy requires controlled exposure to the source of the victim’s anxiety. Allowing the victim exposure to all threats would have the opposite effect, causing amplified trauma. Using content control is, therefore, more comparable to exposure therapy than unrestricted Internet use. Evidence suggests that younger generations are on the side of the argument that is pushing for openness. Younger generations are more open to discussion and exposure to traumas that previous generations experienced. The relatively new technology of the Internet that now allows not only information retrieval, but also participation, creates a platform for discussion. Cyberbullying | While words on a screen may seem harmless, constant cyber bullying can be detrimental to a person’s psyche. Another...
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