MARTA at the mall

This is a photo of the Lenox Mall Marta entrance. The elevator is right in front of it and it is located at the back of the mall of the third floor. Their are ramps on both side of the entrance for the disabled and the entrance is also a very wide opening. Photo taken by Breanna...

The Lenox Dissection: Build Environment Description #2

Main entrance to Lenox retrieved from thecitydweler.me On Friday March 4, 2016 from 4:20pm to 5:20pm I had to opportunity to sit and observe Lenox Mall which is located in the Buckhead area of Atlanta. Lenox Mall was built in 1959 and is currently addressed 3393 Peachtree Rd, Atlanta GA 30326. During the beginning of my observation I sat in the food court on the first floor at a table in between Chic-fil-a and Taziki’s Mediterranean Café. The food court was highly populated and was accompanied by a prospectively high noise level. The “noise” I was experiencing was a combination of conversation among people, R&B music playing from Chiplotlé, and fast food restaurant workers cooking up orders. The food court was very open with a decent amount of sitting space and was also easily navigable. However, the restrooms were not clearly depicted and were hard to find. The next location I moved to was on the second floor right above the food court and I got there via elevator. There was only one elevator and it was located in the corner of the food court. On the second floor there are no seating areas, or any ramps. There were only stores and the restaurant California Pizza Kitchen so I moved along to the third floor. Once I made it to the third floor I was placed right in front of the MARTA entrance with Forever21 on the left and Vans located on the right. Along with the entrance there were ramps, holding rails and, three clusters of seating areas for people to stop at. This floor is where I...

Protest at Lenox: Annotated bib

Blau, Max. “Local Activists Arrested for Shutting down Buckhead Intersection near Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza.” Clatl.com. N.p., 20 Dec. 2014. Web. Protesters in Action retrieved from clatl.com Max Blau, Creative Loafing staff member, constructed an article entitled “Local activists arrested for shutting down Buckhead intersections near Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza”, that speaks about the Michael Brown case and what part Lenox Mall had to play in it. Blau writes “Protesters decided to stage one of their most disruptive demonstrations yet by shutting down a major intersection near two of Atlanta’s biggest shopping centers”. Blau states that the protest was held by the advocacy group by the name of “Rise Up Georgia” and their goal in the protest was to “disrupt economic activity near Lenox Square and Phipps Plaza”.  He also explained the protesters reasoning behind choosing Lenox Square as their protest site. A participant by the name of “Trip” states he participated because he felt like “disrupting economic activity” he believed that more people would pay attention to a message of a “nationwide movement”. However, police officials have classified this protest as “unlawful” and all the participants were arrested and spent a night in jail. This article may be useful to a researcher due to the fact that it highlights Lenox Mall’s ability to be a target for major protests and serve as tool for people to use and manipulate. This says a lot about Lenox as a built...

Sticky Fingers at Lenox: Annotated Bib

Whisenhunt, Dan. “Shoplifting at Lenox Lifts Crime Numbers.” reporternewspapers.net. N.p., 21 Mar. 2013. Web. Crime news reporter Dan Whisenhunt, wrote an article entitled “Shoplifting at Lenox lifts crime numbers”, that discusses the effect of Lenox Square crime rates on the rest of Buckhead and also discusses who’s committing these crimes. Whisenhunt writes “Theft from Lenox was one of Buckhead’s biggest crimes in 2012, according to statistics released by the Atlanta Police Department”. He starts the article by giving a few statistics on the crime rate at Lenox. For example, Whisenhunt states “Buckhead’s police boundary, Zone 2, is Atlanta’s top reporter of property crime, and the Lenox beat had more thefts then any other beat in the zone”. He also states that Carly Dennis the mall’s “spokeswoman” would not go into details about the crime statistics. After discussing the statistics a bit more, he describes the offenders of these crimes. He describes the offenders as “juveniles” with “below average grades” and “strained or nonexistent father relationships”. He also states that most these kids ride the MARTA to the mall and their parents don’t even know they’re there. I believe this article is quite useful for someone who is looking to find out about the mall’s interior environment as far as having the train station connected to the inside and also how’s its affecting the surrounding...

Gender Remodeling: Suzanne Tick Reading Summary

Photo of Suzanne Tick retrieved from SuzanneTick.com Suzanne Tick, founder of Tick Inc., constructs an article entitled “His & Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society” to encourage today’s modelers and designers to create a design that fits everyone. Tick says “Designers, who should focus a critical eye on society’s issues, need to work within this discourse and help promote acceptance and change” (paragraph 1). She starts her argument by stating “today’s design landscape is still deeply rooted by a modern movement shaped by a predominantly male perspective” (paragraph 2). However, she feels that this should not be case. Within the article Tick also explains how “women are becoming more prominent in the workplace”, and its about to for designers to start “incorporating gender sensitivity into their work”. She then explains that this cannot be achieved with simply “regulations and compliance”, because these concepts only go so far. They, being fellow designers and architects, must face the issue head on and “create environments in which people can have their own identity” (paragraph...

How Far Does Accommodation Stretch: Emily Bazelon Reading Summary

American journalist Emily Bazelon constructed an article in “The New York Times Magazine” that dwells on the conversation of separation in today’s bathrooms. Bazelon says “Many people viscerally resist the idea of mixing made and female anatomy in multistall bathrooms and locker rooms” (paragraph 2). Within this article Bazelon supports her argument by shedding light on the fact that the word “accommodate”, a term that oftnely pops up in the bathroom conversation, has more than one meaning. “It can be a word of welcome and hospitality…. but its also a word that involves moving over to make room for other people, whether you want to or not” (paragraph 5). She also states that bathroom separation is a sticky subject because “transgender women believe that they are women, however some women may think otherwise” (paragraph 9). Her main arguemnt at the end of the article focuses on the fact that that todays accommodations only stretch out so far. For example, there have been many changes to accommodate disabled individuals in restrooms like adding buttons that open doors, however there haven’t been many changes for the transgender. Her purpose in composing this article article is to prove that today’s accommodation is just a “starting place” and these issues need to be addressed. The audience of this article may be to the transgender population as well as to the policy makers who are in charge of bathroom regulations....
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