Public Transportation Expansion For Georgia’s Tourists

A famous man by the name of Herschel Walker once said, “Coming from a small town it was tough to dream big. When I grew up in a small town in Georgia, my biggest dream was one day to be able to go to Atlanta.” It is evident that people not only across the United States, but across the world share Herschel Walker’s dream of coming to Atlanta. According to (Hartsfield), Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has been the world’s busiest airport since 1998. This goes to say that Atlanta’s beauty and view points bring in tourists from across the globe. With all of the beauty that Atlanta has to offer, tourists need a way to navigate throughout the city. The Atlanta Street Car and MARTA’s train system give tourists an easy way to navigate throughout Atlanta, but unlike other major cities in the United States, this public transportation systems lack of expansion leaves tourists with inconvenient ways of traveling to other historic landmarks across Georgia. Some of these historic landmarks that tourists may struggle attend include; Stone Mountain, Six Flags over Georgia, and Lake Lanier Islands. Stone Mountain, which is located in Dekalb County is a popular landmark in the state of Georgia. According to (David), Native Americans were the first humans to visit and explore Stone Mountain 9,000 years ago.  Native American tribes used Stone Mountain as an important meeting place where they discussed plans on how to avoid the diseases that the Europeans carried. Around 1847, white settles began to populate the mountain and eventually gave it the name Stone Mountain.  To go along with Stone Mountain’s ancient...

Digital Artifact #3

This drop down menu is labeled “Governor”. Here you have various options you can select from to learn about the governor. You can read his biography, see what the governor priorities are on issues, learn about the governor’s staff, visit the photo gallery, learn about the intern program, and schedule a request to either meet with the governor, schedule a photo, or request his participation in an event. Next, you can learn about the first lady from the drop down menu labeled “First Lady”. Here you’ll find her biography, initiatives, photo gallery, from the desk of the first lady, Georgia’s Children’s Cabinet, the governor’s mansion, and schedule a request. Also, on each of these individual’s page, there’s a stay connected link so you can stay informed on what they’re doing through social...

Digital Artifact #1

This is the homepage of the Georgia government and Governor Nathan Deal website.  Here you’ll find all of the different drop down menus and links to important information regarding Governor Nathan Deal. Also, the homepage is set up to inform you of the latest news, get you to subscribe to Governor Deal’s newsletter, and stay connected via social media. I found it interesting that the homepage has a section to inform you of the latest news regarding Governor Deal and a secondary translate option when you click on accessibility at the bottom of the page, it’ll direct you to another website named georgia.gov where you can translate the website into other...

Annotated Bibliography 7: “Atlanta is the new Hollywood”

From http://endcrawl.com (Click to learn more about the tax incentive) Moore, Christine. ““Atlanta Is the New Hollywood”: Influx of Film and TV Production Boosts Economy, Attracts Actors.” ArtsATL.com. N.p., 04 June 2013. Web. 27 Mar. 2016. In her article, “Atlanta is the new Hollywood : Influx of film and TV production boosts economy, attracts actors”, Christine Moore, claims that Atlanta’s film industry is growing and becoming the new Hollywood. She starts by giving a little bit of background about the careers of, Scott Poythress and Claire Bronson, two actors that are from the Atlanta area. She states that back in 2007, they moved from Decatur to Los Angles “in pursuit of more auditions, better roles, and bigger opportunities”. Two years later they moved back to the “metro Atlanta” area, and Moore tells why. She discusses how Atlanta became more inviting to people in the film and media production industry, due to the “well-publicized tax credits that Georgia started offering in 2008”. Then she explains how the tax credit works. When “movie, television, and digital entertainment companies” work and hire within the state of Georgia, they “can receive up to 30 percent in tax breaks “. She continues her article by discussing some of the “new local studios slated for construction” and “new major production facilities” in Atlanta. They include, “a 400,000-square-foot complex in Gwinnett County with 12 sound stages, to be built by Jacoby Development, and a 288-acre development in Fayette County by Pinewood Shepperton, the British studio that’s home to the James Bond franchise”. Then she goes into talking about how the economy has benefited from the new...

Annotated Bibliography 6

In this journal, Paul Trudeau states that historic preservation has been used as an important tool to preserve urban neighborhoods, and has the potential to be successful in Atlanta as well. Atlanta’s CBD became mostly black after the whites fled to the suburbs in response to the highway construction and commercial expansion following WWII. Wealthy white males used their influence to modify federal programs to promote private investment, which in turn created a barrier between the two communities. Atlanta wanted to expand and did so without thinking of the “slums”, by demolishing them for the good of the commercial activities. Historical designation is proven to impact property values, taxes, rental rates, the well-being of residents, and development in low income areas. This article goes into the most detailed examples of barriers used in the city of Atlanta to segregate the two communities. This article can be used to back up previous annotated bibliography evidence. This source is reliable, although it gives a fairly one sided argument.     Trudeau, Paul J. “Friend Or Foe: The Viability Of Local Designation In The Peoplestown Neighborhood, Atlanta, Georgia.” University of Georgia (1998): n. pag. Web. 1 March 2016.  ...
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