Sexism and Graphic Design: Annotated Bib

Retrieved from Zbrastudios.com “Where Are The Female Designers?” Attitude Design. N.p., 19 Nov. 2007. Web.    The UK based designer team Attitude Designers, conducted a small survey composed of four female “notable web designers” to shed a little bit of light on this question: “Why is it that females don’t seem to be as prominent in web design as they are in say fashion design?” (paragraph two).    The names of the four professionals are , Tanya Merone, Rina Miele , Veerle Pieters, and Larissa Meek . Here are a few example of the questions that were asked during the survey. One question read, “Do you think there are less female designers than male? If so why do you think this is?”(paragraph four). Meek answers, “I know without a doubt that there are less designers in the interactive medium….. many women are creative but the technical fears of computers can seem intimidating”.     Another question read, “Do you have any examples of sexism you have personally had to suffer- with clients of with the industry?”(paragraph nine). Miele answers, “Being taken serious is an issue and men accepting women as professionals and that they’re fully capable as men is also an issue iv’e faced”. On a scale from one to useful I would rate 100 percent useful. This survey gives first hand accounts from four well-known female web designers about their experience in this field. Persons doing research on web design and sexism may find this very useful, researchers interested in the build environment of the web design industry can also use this, and this may even be useful to some interested in...

Reading Summaries 3 & 4

Tick, Suzanne. “His & Hers: Designing for a Post-Gender Society.” Metropolis Magazine. Mar. 2015. Web. 06 Feb. 2016. Writer Suzanne Trick gives her realtors insight on how “gender-neutral design” is bound to become the next big thing in the workplace. We don’t initially pay attention that how offices are normally designed from men. We are so accustomed to the masculine theme of workplaces because of men’s power roles throughout history. The males’ needs were deemed as the most important, so the design of the workspaces had been catered to their needs. There is an apparent new wave of feminism. With help from Emma Watson and the LGBTQ community, there has become a more gradual acceptance of unisex spaces. “In the workplace, the barriers in hierarchies have started to come down as women have become more prominent.” Designers have started incorporating “gender sensitivity “into the spaces that they’re designing. Because of the growing trend of the obscuring of gender roles the accommodation for those in transgender communities and androgynists has become more necessary. In the workplace, bathrooms have become the main focus of this new trend that we’ve been discussing. Some coworkers aren’t comfortable with sharing a restroom with a transgender coworker. Now the concern becomes how can restrooms in the workplace accommodate all genders while respecting each individual’s needs. Bazelon, Emily. “Making Bathrooms More ‘Accommodating’.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 21 Nov. 2015. Web. 06 Feb. 2016. In this article Emily Bazelon points out that the word “accommodate” is often used when discussing bathroom access and can be both welcoming and hospitable, and compulsive. It has...
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