Exterior Environment: Edgewood/Candler Park MARTA Station

The Edgewood/Candler Park station on MARTA’s train system serves as both a terminus station for the Green Line and a regular station for the Blue Station. Built in the 70’s (opened June 30, 1979) this particular station services the Edgewood and Candler neighborhoods, which are comprised of mostly working-class, blue collar workers. Interestingly enough, a quick but concise analysis of the station’s special rhetoric will show how it was built to serve this community in particular. The layout of the building itself is simple enough. The station has two floors, the top being where people enter the station and the bottom being the boarding area where passengers get on/off the MARTA trains. On the outside of the MARTA station on either side are bus depots, surrounded by a sizable parking lot. Most of the incoming traffic of passengers is funneled through two tunnels that lead from the stairs to the second floor where you can access the MARTA train by either tapping your MARTA Breeze card at the gates or purchasing one at the card dispensers located only feet away from the gates and entrances. The basic idea the layout seems to emulate is practicality. The place was designed to allow everyone to get where the need to be and do what they need to do as fast and as hassle free as possible. Therefore, the station is fairly open in that the area around the gates is big enough to accommodate large crowds and the building itself is not closed off from the outside, so it’s less of a building, and more of an open structure. This leads...

Exterior Built Environment Description

As I pass Piedmont Park and pull into the entrance of the Atlanta Botanical Garden, I feel as if I have been transported into the middle of the woods. As I wait in line to receive my parking ticket, I notice that I am surrounded by various massive trees and plants. After getting my ticket, I drive through several levels of parking decks until I finally find a space to park in. I then proceed to wait in line to buy a ticket into the garden. I have only been in the garden for five minutes and already it seems very busy, especially for a weekday. Walking through the garden that has been here since 1985, I see tons of beautifully kept plants and flowers (Mission and History). Most of the flowers and plants exhibited have nameplates to specify what species they are. Many of the exhibits and sculptures are also named after people, probably because of donations made by those people to the garden. The garden has a special exhibit set up for the month of February that showcases an abundance of orchids. The orchids are bright purple and give off a strong unfamiliar scent.  Walking through the garden using the map they provided, I see an herb and vegetable garden which showcase an array of dark greens and both give off smells which remind me of my mother’s kitchen in the summer. The tropical conservatory I entered next makes me feel as if I am in the jungle. The noise level is very high with waterfalls, birds, and frogs all making noise at the same time. One...

Constitution Lakes Park Exterior Built Environment Description

At first you’re lost and have to open up three different types of navigation systems in order to find Constitution Lakes Park. Then just when your circling around for the third time about to give up, you see a sign in front of you that reads “Constitution Lakes Park”. You then drive inside only wondering if this really is the entrance to the park and not just a closed entrance that leads you to your doom. However, you still keep on driving because you know whatever is waiting on the other side will be absolutely worth the experience. Constitution Lakes Park is located in southeast Atlanta about 7 miles from Georgia State University, which is about a 15 minute drive without traffic. DeKalb County bought the park in 2003 and made it into what it is now. Including the boardwalk, the parking lot, and of course the famous Doll Head Trail. Constitution Lakes park is a nature preserve like no other. It’s inside the city and incorporates to the Industrial Area. It’s surrounded by a lot of wildlife activity and still has a part of Atlanta in it. You can find the regular things a park will naturally have such as benches and a beautiful view and trees. However you want see a playground for little kids. And unlike any other Park you won’t see a Doll Head Trail. Although the thought of a Doll Head Trail may sound creepy and scary, it’s actually very artsy and kid friendly. The Park does encourage you to add onto the Doll Head Trail but only by adding whatever you find in the park. Taggers...
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