Rough Draft One

The Experience Economy Here is a common question: “If you could go anywhere in the world, where would you go?” When asked this question, what exactly shapes the answers that people respond with? Well, the chosen destination has to be appealing in some way to them. Environments are actually made to be appealing to others for the very reason of capturing the attention of strangers for the enhancement of their own experience economies. The experience economy, as scholars Marling, Jensen, and Kiib assert, is centered on the idea of creating a stimulating environment with attractions to demonstrate a higher standard of living, and thus inviting visitors to engage in a given space. Typically, an environment that actively participates in the experience economy includes some level of Disneyfication—“anything that looks negative is removed and the facts are buried” (Matusitz & Palermo 97). In order to appeal to people, cities are beautified and promoted to unrealistic or biased extremes. The incentive for Disneyfication is actually economic growth within certain corporate businesses as well as the overall environment. Due to healthy competition, this phenomenon is global. Atlanta, Georgia most evidently began its Disneyfication through an experience economy around the year 1988 according to scholars from the American Sociological Association Gallagher and Lacy. From then on, Atlanta has adopts several attraction sites and become the home for major corporations like CNN and Coca-Cola. In this way, Atlanta is acknowledged for its thorough growth and can actually be called a “fun” place to visit—or at least that is the goal. Without taking the initiative to build up an appealing environment, Atlanta would not be...

Underwater Experience at the Georgia Aquarium

                    The Georgia Aquarium is all about experience. The space heavily relies on visual to capture its audience, but also integrates other forms of interaction. In order to invite visitors, the space is made to be comfortable for those occupy it. Before an environment can truly be comfortable, it must provide accommodation. Therefore, through the way the aquarium accommodates its guests imply the types of people it was established for. A space built for experience, however, cannot succeed simply through accommodation, but also through capturing and engaging its visitors. The interior of the Georgia Aquarium convincingly demonstrates this phenomenon. The photo on the far left displays a tank that greatly exceeds the limits of the picture frame. The picture is filled with the color blue which imitates an ocean. The space allows the guests to be surrounded by a deep hue of blue which should make them feel as though they are intertwined with the underwater life. This visual effect not only gives an impression of how vast the ocean is, but also involves the visitors as they comfortably sit on the carpeted floors and gaze into everything the tank–the living movie screen–has to offer. The visual experience that this room provides is highly effective. The adjacent image shown in the middle demonstrates a tangible experience the aquarium offers. The tank is uncovered, leveled at a personal height, and has a sign above it that invites guests to feel the starfish inside the tank using two fingers. Within the frame of the picture, there are two youthful-looking hands on the stone surrounding...

The CDC Has a Museum?

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) is a major global organization based in Atlanta near Emory University, if not a part of the campus. Apart from being a significant public health facility, there is a museum within the gated community that is free and open to the public according to the website. That claim is questionable in that once entering the facility, visitors are required to present an ID to security. Visitors have a limit of how far they can travel within the building. The museum is located right within the lobby area where visitors can be easily monitored by employees. The area is greatly spatial and lacks furniture which crafts minimalistic appeal that aligns well with the modern, science-orientated theme of the space. The appearance of lobby is dominated by the color white–white tiled floors, white walls, white pillars, white desks. Apart from white, the space is heavily designed with lustrous metal that reflects like mirrors and includes a large surface area of windows. The natural lighting mixed with the fluorescent lighting in the lobby accentuate the brightness of the pale, neutral color theme. These aspects emphasize the cleanliness of the facility. The simplicity within that color scheme creates a modern minimalistic vibe. The museum, however, portrays a different mood. The floors are carpeted, and apart from the natural lighting that is still present, the area has warm lighting. The museum utilizes a variety of colors instead of sticking to neutrals. This gives the impression of artistic freedom and diverse environment. The variety in color, as well as in presentation of projects, functions to capture the attention...
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