What Makes the Varsity so Successful When There’s Plenty of other Chain restaurants in Atlanta?

  The Varsity: One-of-a-Kind Dining Recently over the course of this semester we have studied and analyzed multiple locations and gave vast insight of the environment. Between Moreland Avenue, The Varsity and the Atlanta Police Department, the Varsity particularly had a greater impact on me than the other two. The first thing noticeable was the red and white colors and the old-style sports theme, which instantly attracted me to the restaurant. Upon walking through the door a loud “what’ll ya have” will overtake the visitor and make them take notice of the fast paced restaurant they have just entered. The fast paced environment doesn’t make the guest feel uneasy, but at a place you can call home. As you approach the counter you’re studying the menu to find they serve burgers, chilidogs, world famous onion rings, and the exclusive one-of-a-kind frosted orange (a frozen orange sherbet type of drink). After you give your order and receive your food, you go look for a seat but notice each room is different. In one room you have school desks as if you were back in elementary school, while in the next room you have booths and tables with a few TV’s displaying the current sports game, and in the last room you see booths and glass windows displaying a scenic view of Atlanta. As you make your choice and sit down, you begin to eat and taste the dry hamburger with non-melted cheese, basic condiments, and chili hit your lips and you’re in awe. You’re not in awe of the taste, but the lack of quality the food has, but you...

FIRST DRAFT: Communal Differences: Little Five Points v. Virginia-Highlands (Built Environment Analysis)

While strolling down the stained sidewalks of Little Five Points, drum beats played on turned over buckets pulse through the streets, the smell of street food fills the air, and an array of people explore the funky shops. On the contrary, on the streets of Virginia Highlands there is certain stillness. Other than the sound of cars zooming by, the area has peacefulness to it. The restaurants are more uniform and so are the people. Surrounding the shops and restaurants are suburban homes with front porch swings and minivans. These two areas are in close proximity, but differ greatly. The built environments of Little Five Points and Virginia Highlands shape and are shaped by different groups of people due to differences in the historical foundation of the spaces, the layout of the streets, and the location of these neighborhoods in proximity to other influential spaces in Atlanta.   Historical Foundation An area’s historical background influences how the built environment of that space develops as time goes on. Since the late 1960’s Little Five Points has been known for its odd knick-knack shops, antiques, and discount clothing (Wheatley). Even back then people knew they could go to Little Five Points to save money on movie theaters, clothing, and other goods. It is interesting to see how that trend has stayed with and developed the area over the last fifty years. Because the neighborhood’s roots are deep into the eclectic culture of city living and freedom of expression, the area has not developed into anything more than just that. Because the area has been “known for” a certain type of merchandise and...

Built Environment Analysis- Segregation is Not Over

Madison Brooks Dr. Robin Wharton Engl 1102 20 April 2016 Segregation is Not Over As Atlanta, Georgia made steps to recover after World War II, African Americans were treated as second-class citizens by Caucasians as commercial expansion uprooted their homes and inner city development was used to push them out of the city and into the suburbs. As a result, African Americans and Caucasians began and continue to settle in separate communities. African Americans and Caucasians live segregated mainly because Caucasians physically forced African Americans out of their existing homes and into the suburbs. After World War II, programs intended for reconstruction wound up only benefiting wealthy, politically powerful men (Bullard 12). These men were uninterested in improving areas of deteriorating poverty in the city. Federal programs such as anti-poverty projects were gradually ignored, and as a result failed miserably. For example, Atlanta begun the Model Cities Program in 1966 in an effort to fix the problems in Atlanta’s low-income neighborhoods, which were mostly inhabited by African Americans (Holliman 21). The program was substantially underfunded and understaffed and did little for the living conditions of the select neighborhoods. Instead of finding other ways to improve these lower-class areas, politicians’ solutions were to simply destroy these “slums” and create new developments over them in the race to expand Atlanta into a tourist destination (Holliman 21). As well as African American families forced out of their homes, the larger activity in private development compared to federal government programs, caused Caucasians to steadily drive an increasing gap between the social classes of Caucasians and African Americans (Pooley). In the 20th century, in addition...

Digital Space Description- Woodruff Arts Center

For my digital space built environment, I chose was www.woodruffartscenter.org. The website is for the Woodruff Arts Center. The opening webpage, which is presented below, is aesthetically appealing and has six sections that viewers can search to explore the site. Using those sections, you can discover the art, plan a visit to the center, plan an event at the center, explore the Woodruff, support the center with various forms of donations, and see the different programs and initiatives that the Woodruff Arts Center has to offer. Due to the abundant amount of information presented on the site, I focused predominantly on the four sections that were the most captivating to me.     When you scroll down on the opening page of the Woodruff Arts Center site, a page of tabs appears. Each of the tabs allows you to explore the site and find information on an array of things. The viewer has the option to check out ticket prices, donate time and money to the center, plan an event at the center, use the center as a form of education, and parking at the center. Each section for the information is presented with colorful, people friendly images, while still being useful and guiding people to what they were searching for.     Located under the ‘Explore the Woodruff’ tab is the Woodruff Arts Center Overview page. The purpose of this section no the website is to provide people with a little bit of background information on the center itself and its reputability. It establishes a sense of credibility by mentioning its great accomplishments, such as being “one of...

Analysis: Restaurants

The choices of restaurants in downtown are pretty vague compared to midtown. I’m not referring to chain restaurants, but strictly streets with multiple restaurants on almost each block. Downtown Atlanta has two streets with multiple restaurants in each block: Broad Street and Peachtree Street. Example of restaurants in those areas (not including chain restaurants) are Alma Cocina on 191 Peachtree St NE and Naanstop on 64 Broad St NW. In contrast, midtown have multiple restaurants located in Atlantic Station, Lenox Mall, Tech Square, Ponce de Leon, and 10th Street. But mere numbers of restaurants would not conclude why gay couples appear more prevalent in midtown than downtown. The cosmetics of the infrastructures also plays a part. The way the buildings look in Tech Square or Atlantic Station have a more modern neat appearance than the buildings in downtown. For example, the beige colored bricks that the restaurants are made up of on Broad Street are tainted with multiple black streaks while Tech Square’s brown colored bricks on their restaurants almost remains true to it’s color. The difference between the look of the buildings displays a difference in class of the people who are residing in that...

Analysis: Malls and Other Shopping Centers

One of the many stereotypes of gay individuals is that they are very passionate shoppers. So for that reason, one would conclude that the fact that midtown provides various places to shop, enables gay couples to stay around midtown. That’s not the reason why I think gay couples are more visually apparent in midtown. Large scale shopping centers like Lenox Mall on 3393 Peachtree Rd., or Atlantic Station on 1380 Atlantic Dr NW have mixtures of stores that are for couples with a stable income that can afford extra goods. Compared to downtown where Peachtree Center Mall on 231 Peachtree St NE is their largest shopping area. Unfortunately, this mall is not an acceptable place to shop but centers more around resturants that is placed underneath the mall. Homosexual partner’s “median household income is significantly higher ($94,000) than among heterosexual couples ($86,000)” ( Kurtzleben par. 3). One factor for this is due to the higher education level gay couples posses. Another reason is that very few gay couples have children in their household which allows them to use the extra expenses on themselves. Those extra expenses would go towards the shopping malls. Also, living by an area that have shopping malls is more convinient than driving or walking from downtown t...
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