Actually An Annotation: Act Like A Student, Analyze (Video) Like A Teacher

Lee, Joon Sun, Herbert P. Ginsberg, and Michael D. Preston. “Analyzing Videos to Learn to Think Like an Expert Teacher.” Beyond the Journal, July 2007. Web. 28 Mar. 2016. Joon Sun Lee is assistant professor of early childhood education at Hunter College of the City University of New York, Herbert P. Ginsburg a professor of psychology and education at  Columbia University, and Michael D. Preston of CCNMTL, executive director of NYC Foundation for Computer Science Education “describe and discuss our experiences as university researchers integrating videos into courses on early childhood mathematics education in their paper, Analyzing Videos to Learn to Think Like an Expert Teacher. The authors relied heavily on primary sources like their personal experiences as researchers integrating videos into courses for childhood, conducting their own studies and recording their own information from said experiments. Their purpose in writing this article is to exhibit the positive effects of integrating videos into the mathematic curriculum of young children and to promote the integration of videos into common curriculum. The intended audience are those researching the effect of the introduction of digital spaces or rhetoric, including video, into curriculum and other teachers or professors. This article is useful because it exhibits first hand evidence of the usefulness of integrating digital rhetoric and/or spaces into early childhood curriculum, resulting in the advancement of analysis skills for the kids introduced. The article is useful to researchers, teachers, and kids who would benefit from integration or analysis of videos to improve analyzation...

A New Revolution of Learning, a Summary of “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments”

The era of paper and pen style writing is beginning to decline as technology is advancing. Writing styles are beginning to evolve, taking a more modern shape and allowing writing to incorporate images, audience interaction and sounds, something absent in paper and pen writing. In her paper “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments“, Mary E. Hocks discusses this evolution and the incorporation of digital documents in writing. Hocks divides her paper into two sections with one section using two academic hypertextual essays to help explain the visual digital rhetoric and the other section discussing how teachers should incorporate visual digital rhetoric in their teaching. In addition to this, she also divides the visual digital rhetoric into three categories: Audience stance, transparency and hybridity. The audience stance is the way the author creates ethos and the degree of audience participation. Transparency is how familiar the terminology and concepts of the article is to the audience. Lastly, hybridity is how the site combines images and texts. Hocks begins by examining the first academic hypertextual essay, “Monitoring Order” by Anne Wysocki. The first thing Hocks points out is how Wysocki promotes audience participation by providing interactive text and images, allowing the audience to progress through the essay in an order that they chose. As a result, the essay promotes active reading and decreases attention fatigue, something that all too common with long academic articles or papers. The saying “A picture is worth a million words” is beginning to be proven in the modern day style of writing (bloging etc). Sourced from Transformation Marketing The second thing Hocks discusses is how Wysocki establishes transparency by using a familiar format, colors and...
css.php