Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments

In her essay “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments”, Mary E. Hocks discusses how digital environments are designed with features like “audience stance, transparency, and hybridity” (629). The ” visual and interactive nature of native hypertext and multimedia writing” (629) makes it difficult for scholars to distinguish words from visuals, as Hocks suggests “Interactive digital texts can blend words and visuals  talk and text, and authors and audiences in ways that are recognizably postmodern (630). She references ” Gary Heba’s delineation of how html authoring mirrors rhetorical processes for composition” (630) and ” Patricia Sullivan’s arguments that expand our definitions of electronic writing to include graphics, screen design, and other media form” (630). The work of early professionals in “technical communication” that “demonstrated how rhetorical decisions impact the visual design of an online document or system” (630) alerted scholars  to think about the visual aspect of writing. Anne Wysocki stated that “computer-based interactive media can now blend text and images so thoroughly that they are indistinguishable on the screen (2010)” (630). These arguments have convinced teachers to redefine what we consider to be  writing. Hocks introduces the idea of interpreting new media as “hybrid forms” . As students we “look at artifacts such as online games or Web sites” (630) and we make  “assumptions about gender, age, nationality, or other identity categories” (630). Hocks states that all writing is hybrid that “it is at once verbal, spatial, and visual.” (631).  As interactive digital media has become a part of college writing courses, writing is now  “internetworked writing”-writing that involves the intertwining of production, interaction, and publication in the online classroom or professional workplace...

The Atlanta Beltline’s Potential to Increase Racial Inequality

Jacob, Brown. “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline.” Emory University, 2013. Web. In his thesis “Respatializing Race: The Open Case of the Atlanta Beltline”,  Jacob Brown a student of the London School of Economics at Emory University, discusses the ” spatial dimensions of racial inequality” (3) that exist in Atlanta. In particular he examines the Beltline and “interrogates its broader potential to act as an agent of racial equity” (4). Brown notes that while the Beltline contributes green and art spaces and “connect Atlanta’s neighborhoods through multi-use trails and rail transit” (4) it can also have a “potential effect on Atlanta’s racial inequality” (4). Other projects such as the Olympic Park, Turner Field, Underground Atlanta and Omni International (5) claimed to solve issues similar to those addressed with the Beltline. However, these projects have all led to displaced impoverished black communities. Brown suggests because the Beltline shares characterisitcs of these projects and “how race affected these developments, and vice versa, indicates the Beltline’s potential relationship with racial equity” (7).  Northeast Beltline (Author’s Own) This source is useful for researchers because it shows how Atlanta’s environment is built to enhance disparities between  its “wealthy White north side”and “poor Black south side” and how this impact weakens social connections between neighborhoods. In the case of the Beltline the development appears to be beneficial providing “small businesses along the pedestrian trails, residential developments, art installations and parks” (10). However, this small improvement is overshadowed by inequalities. The Beltline rail is designed in a way that “divide neighborhoods and constrain intra-neighborhood connections” (16) leading to social exclusion due to lack of transportation. The purpose of this source is...

Expository of HNHH Website

HotNewHipHop can be located in various ways. One way you can access this site is by manually entering the the URL. Another way is by searching ” hot new  hip hop” in any search engine and it would be the first link that pulls up. What i noticed in google is that if you search “hot new” in the search bar, the site would be the first link. If you search “hip hop” in the search bar of google, it would be the fourth to fifth link. So in conclusion, It would seem that this site is a site that has been visited frequently. search result When you immediately enter the site, the three dominant colors of the whole site are red, white and black. The red color acts as a guideline to lead the users to important links while the white color enables a breathing point for the user’s eyes. The design of the site looks modern and has a simplicity look to it. It makes sense that way, because the site contains a variety of content ranging between pictures, videos and text. When you look deeper to the images and videos of the content, it displays mostly the African American race. The clothing style of most images of the black people represents new money which is basically wearing flamboyant clothing and many gold accessories. example of images displayed on HNHH When navigating the site, it’s required to have a computer with the proper amount of ram and pretty decent processor because of the content the site contains. A site simple like Google would load up around the same time...

AB for “Efficiency and Innovativeness as Determinants of Design Architecture Choices”

Abecassis-Moedas, Celine, and Pierre-Jean Benghozi. “Efficiency And Innovativeness As Determinants Of Design Architecture Choices.” Journal Of Product Innovation Management 29.3 (2012): 405-418. Business Source Complete. Web. 28 Feb. 2016.   In the article “Efficiency and Innovativeness as Determinants of Design Architecture Choices”, the authors, Abecassis-Moedas, Celine Benghozi, and Pierre-Jean, suggest that “internal design offers greater efficiency, whereas external design provides increased innovativeness”. They gathered information from face-to-face interviews and archival documents. The purpose of this article is to provide some insight for architectural designers on how other designers in this field make decisions when creating internal and external spaces for a company. This source is useful because it describes different techniques and ideas that designers use in their creative process. The authors analyze the decisions that companies make in terms of internal and external design.  ...

Annotated Bibliography 6 : Unit Two

from https://theaterseatingturkey.wordpress.com “Resources_IdeasInfo_typesandformsoftheatre.pdf.” Web. 20 Feb. 2016. In their article, “Types and Forms of Theatre”, Theatre Projects Consultants, a group of specialists who build performance spaces, claim that, “There is no ideal size of a theatre [because] the scale of a theatre depends on the size of the staging required by the type of performance and the number of audience to be accommodated, with each variable influencing the other as they change.” To support their claim, they explain the different types of performance spaces and the purpose of each type. The types of spaces they describe are drama, music, opera, dance,multipurpose, worship, teaching, media interaction and entertainment. To further explain, they give detailed descriptions of each type and provide examples of these theaters from various cities. The purpose of this article is to explain the different types of theater set-ups and their purposes. It will be a useful source to someone that wants to know about how the function of a theater influences its...

Annotated Bibliography 5: Unit Two

from http://www.britannica.com “Theatre Design – The Goals of Theatre Design | Architecture.” Encyclopedia Britannica. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Feb. 2016. In their article, “Theatre Design – The Goals of Theatre Design”, the editors of Encyclopedia Britannica, a global educational publisher, they claim that “Theatre design is primarily concerned with enhancing the experience the audience can have at a performance [and] the specific architectural elements considered ideal for improving that experience will differ from culture to culture and sometimes even between subcultures within a given culture.” To support this claim, they describe two different categories of elements in a design, each being used for a different purpose. The two categories are “those that serve the aesthetics deemed appropriate for the art of theatre in a given culture, and those that optimize the experience of that art for the audience.” In the article they provide information on each of them, stating that “Those elements that serve the aesthetics of the art of theatre can involve everything from what the performers need to reach the artistic standards deemed proper before a performance starts to what they need to support the required amount of spectacle during performance, whether it be a bare stage or a stage with enormous movable sets and a spectacular array of props.” In contrast, “The elements that are most often discussed in terms of optimizing the experience had by the audience revolve around audience comfort”. Then they explain which areas of the theatre fit in each category. They state that, “those elements of a theatre’s design that serve primarily to optimize the experience of the audience are the house...
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