“Better Online Living through Content Moderation”

In this article, Melissa King talks about how people who suffer from PTSD or users who want to make their “online experiences” less irritable have every right to content control features. Critics of content control features believe that people like this are “too sensitive” and they should be able to deal with whatever comes from these online experiences. Despite their opinions, the author states how the content control features are very helpful in eliminating any anxiety attacks. The author then goes on to discuss computer-chair psychology and how exposure therapy can “inure an individual to these triggers and lesson the disruptions they can cause”, but it is more harmful than helpful to the individual in this case of anxiety. In this case of the exposure therapy “trauma is magnified rather than reduced when faced with triggering content”, therefore content exposure should be controlled. She then talks about how blocklists have come to rise and how many people feel they are being “defamed” when added to the blocklist. King states that these arguments fail to acknowledge “how vicious and pervasive online harassment can be” and it is always the right of the victim to take steps to protect themselves. At the end of the article the author talks about how women suffer greatly from these attacks and there is an issue of sexism. She concludes that with issues like sexism and online bullying that hold great evidence of PTSD, people should be able to control their online...

Better Online Living: Melissa King Reading Summary

UC Santa Cruz graduate Melissa King constructs an article discussing the importance of media content control and why opposers believe that the control isn’t necessary. Cruz states “Nobody should be required to read or listen to content if they don’t want to” (paragraph one). Retrieved from contentmarketinginstitute.com She first gives examples content control features such as “block and ignore functions”,”privacy options”, and “content/trigger warnings”. She later provides a claim that these functions are vital in preventing internet harassment, which can later lead to “PTSD”: post traumatic stress disorder. However, opposers of content control claim that the users of this these tools are “too sensitive”. King then provides an argument by Caleb Lack, “a licensed clinical psychologist and psychology professor who specializes in treating anxiety disorders”, that counteracts the opposing arguemnt. He states “I think it’s relatively safe to say that you can get PTSD from twitter, due to the knowledge about cyber bullying and PTSD” (paragraph 5). King then goes on to explain how “women who tread in male dominated areas suffer from intimidation tactics” the most. For example, women in the “tech industry” and in “video game culture” are subject to these harassments. She also explains that the majority or content control are “individuals who are not regular targets of digital abuse” (paragraph 12). Lastly she she makes a final statement on why content control is essential. ” Content control gives people more room to act on behalf of their own mental and emotional needs” (paragraph...

Controlling Your Online Space

Melissa King’s Better Online Living through Content Moderation addresses the “anti-content control rhetoric.” In the digital age new information is constantly and consistently presented to people, especially if said people have an online presence. Features such that block and limit search results and privacy options are given to users as needed as one does not need all of said information (for various reasons.) She claims that with or without reason an online user should be allowed to control the data they are receiving. King says there is a pressure on those that use these features as some cast of a very negative view on content control. This causes people to be exposed to materials they are adverse to and even worse than that, materials that can quite literally harm some user’s health i.e. sufferers of PTSD. She then addresses some of the ways controlled content is fought. “You’re over-exaggerating, it’s really not that bad. Try not to be so sensitive.” Those statements minimize the seriousness of disorders like PTSD or anxiety. The idea being one must expose themselves to the trigger to attempt to get better. King calls this an “informal parallel to Exposure Therapy.” Internet attacks testing one’s mental health are not the same as a controlled therapy setting she says. She also notes that this kind of attack can stem from a generational disparity as millennials want to tackle tough or sensitive issues head on. People also do not understand that PTSD is not just a disorder caused my war, but an overall traumatic event. Bullying is real and prevalent in online spaces and some people really do...

Reading Summaries 5 & 6

King, Melissa. “Better Online Living through Content Moderation.” Model View Culture. 14 Oct. 15. Web. 07 Mar. 2016. This article shows us the relationship between PTSD and content control. Some people have argued that PTSD is only associated with those who have been in the military, but they are mistaken. Individuals who have been affected by bullying can also experience PTSD, and this is where content control comes into play. Melissa King lets us know that content control is referring to “block and ignore functions, content/trigger warnings, blocklists and privacy options.” These features aid people who may risk triggering their anxiety from unwanted content on the Internet. These same individuals get criticized and are told to “just deal with it” when it comes to online abuse and unwanted content. Content control has become a very helpful solution to this new internet problem. “Content control is helpful in limiting the worst of these attacks, which themselves can cause PTSD if severe or long-term enough. While using content control features is not guaranteed to stop the effects of abuse, they do help and their use should not be disparaged and discouraged.” Bennin, Phia, and Brendan McMullen. “Color Walking.” Radiolab Blogland. 29 June 2012. Web. 07 Mar. 2016. http://www.radiolab.org/story/214709-color-walk/ Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullen introduce us to this new idea of “Color Walking.” You simply walk out the door, let a color catch your eye, and follow it for as long as you can, or until another color excites you. The main idea is to follow one object to the next with similar colors, and get “lost” along the way. Let yourself...

Content Control Controversy : A Summary of Melissa King’s Article

From: hellogiggles.com In her article, “Better Online Living through Content Moderation”, Melissa King discuses the necessity of “content control features”, such as “block and ignore functions, content/trigger warnings, blocklists and privacy options”, on the internet and the “cultural opposition” against it. She explains that the these “tools” are helpful to “users [that] may suffer from PTSD and need to avoid topics and people that trigger their anxiety”. Kings argues that “nobody should be required to read or listen to content if they do not want to”. She continues the article with talking about the oppositions raised against “content control”. The people against these “tools” retaliate by called the users of them “weak” and “too sensitive”. King suggests that the “opponents are creating a culture that pressures people to expose themselves to experiences far more catastrophic than they can handle” and that “it becomes entirely the victim’s problem when they are attacked online, no matter the situation, and they should ‘just deal with it'”. A common argument against “content control” is that the victims are just blowing things out of proportion and that “they should try being ‘less sensitive'”. King states that these arguments often result in an “informal parallel to Exposure Therapy”,  which is “a type of therapy designed to combat severe anxiety through gradual and controlled exposure to its source, to inure an individual to these triggers and lesson the disruptions they can cause”. When people are discussing “content control” they often misinterpret the concept of “Exposure Therapy” and they fail to realize that “without controlled exposure, someone suffering from PTSD is likely to have their trauma magnified...
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