Bibliographic Annotation 8

Bibliographic Annotation #8: “Communal Commuting: What I’ve Learned From Riding Marta” Maddux, Rachael, and KENDRICK BRIHSON. “Communal Commuting: What I’ve Learned From Riding MARTA.” Atlanta 53.2 (2013): 82-97. MasterFILE Elite. Web. 20 Apr. 2016.   This article is a day in the life that Rachel Maddux experienced whiled taking MARTA on a daily commute. She explains the purpose of her riding and the pros and cons her of her daily commutes. In comparison, she follows up with what the ride means to her and how she believes it has changed her ability to live life as a better person. It was valid to my argument because it gives a first hand experience and helps further my point that MARTA is a necessary form of transit that gives everyone a chance to commute and find work elsewhere, not just an immediate surrounding. I believe this was a well-wrapped article and lacked no weaknesses She developed a thorough built environment description and gave me a first hand feel of her daily travels. She then mentioned the pros and cons and gave some factual evidence to support the necessity of MARTA. I believe this will directly correlate with my writing and additional sources, because she drives home the point that everyone on MARTA should be treated equal and not of a lesser...

Annotated Bibliography Nine (Bicycle Commuting)

“Exploring the Effects of the Built Environment on Bicycle Commuting.”Exploring the Effects of the Built Environment on Bicycle Commuting. University of Minnesota, Sept. 2013. Web. 01 Apr. 2016. This article discusses a survey conducted by the Humphrey School of Public Affairs and the Department of Civil Engineering in which residents from three different areas in Minneapolis were asked if they bicycled and if so, then how frequently. The results of the survey found that 25 percent of the respondents commuted by bike and one-fifth of the bicyclers used their bikes to get to work four or five times a week. The survey also found that those who lived near bike lanes were more likely to use them; however, this did not necessarily mean these same people would use their bike to get to work. Instead, according to the survey, what influences whether or not one will commute to work with their bike is distance and parking. With respect to parking—if a person’s workplace has free nearby parking, then their chances of using a bike to commute to work goes...

Annotated Bibliography Nine (Bicycle Commuting)

“Exploring the Effects of the Built Environment on Bicycle Commuting.”Exploring the Effects of the Built Environment on Bicycle Commuting. University of Minnesota, Sept. 2013. Web. 01 Apr. 2016. This article discusses a survey conducted by the Humphrey School of Public Affairs and the Department of Civil Engineering in which residents from three different areas in Minneapolis were asked if they bicycled and if so, then how frequently. The results of the survey found that 25 percent of the respondents commuted by bike and one-fifth of the bicyclers used their bikes to get to work four or five times a week. The survey also found that those who lived near bike lanes were more likely to use them; however, this did not necessarily mean these same people would use their bike to get to work. Instead, according to the survey, what influences whether or not one will commute to work with their bike is distance and parking. With respect to parking—if a person’s workplace has free nearby parking, then their chances of using a bike to commute to work goes...
css.php