Reading Summary 5: Color Walking

The purpose of this short article was to teach us about color walks and to tell us about the authors’ own experience with color walks. Color walks were created by William Burroughs. “Back in the day, William Burroughs dreamed up a tool to inspire his students: color walks.” The authors of this article came across the experiment while working on the colors show and decided to give the experiment a try and write about their experience. In their trial of the color walk the chose to be flexible and switch from color to color. The authors stated, “We first ran across color walks in this blog post from Sal Randolph, which features two great quotes from Burroughs: “Color: William Burroughs Walking on Color”.” The instructions on how to do a color walk are simple. To perform a color walk, “Just walk out your door, pick a color that catches your eye, and watch your surroundings pop as you follow the color from object to object.” In this article, the color walk started at WYNC, in lower Manhattan on a Sunday afternoon. The first color they started out with was blue. Blues led to pinks which led to violets. Their color walk took approximately 14 minutes. At the end of their walk the described the walk saying, “…the colors hung in our brains and eyes.” They also stated, “We walked away seeing a world brimming over with colors: the rusty orange of a rooftop water tower in the sun, a bright blue mohawk, and the humble yellowy greens of a new leaf all jumped into our eyes.” The authors provided a...

“Color Walking”: Reading Summary

“Color Walking” by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan is an article about a unique style of physical and mental exercise the two authors have found to be quite satisfying.  They got the idea from William Burroughs, who used it mainly to inspire his students.  He called the activity “color walks.”  A color walk is when you walk outside and select a color that catches your eye and you follow that color wherever you see it as you walk. As the authors attempted a color walk, they decided to be more flexible and switch between different colors as they are exposed to different objects along the walk.  They began their walk in Manhattan and with their eyes set on the color blue.  Their quest to find blue would then shift to pink, and then violet.  Along with the description of their day entailed in their article is a timeline included.  The authors snapped photos of the objects that caught their attention throughout the walk such as a scarf, and a set of basketball courts in the city. Finally, the authors added some advice for any readers who would like to try a color walk themselves and reflect on their own activities.  They warn that after a color walk colors will ring bright and vivid in one’s eyes and in mind as did theirs.  According to them, the best way to color walk is to allot at least an hour of time to it, select an attention-grabbing color to follow, and do not stress if you find yourself to be lost; because that is the whole point of the walk. Color...

Color Walking- A summary (#5)

Posted by: vi.sualize.us   The article, “Color Walking,” written by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan, is about an experiment that a teacher named William Burroughs designed to spark an idea for students to think about color. The students are surrounded by a huge variety of colors, thus Burroughs told the students to go outside and choose a color that would lead them from object to object. Interestingly, the objects may change from a purse to an ice cream cone within minutes. This allows the students to observe the details of the community and keep an open mind of how everything is designed. Bennin and McMullan gave a personal experience of an experiment held at “WNYC, in lower Manhattan, one Sunday afternoon.” At the end of the article, there was a suggestion to try the experiment. The authors said to pick a color as desired then make connections of the different colors from object to...

“Color Walking” reading summary

  This article is documents Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan’s coloring walking experience. They were inspired to do this color walk after coming across the experiment that William Burroughs had his students do in the past. Color walking consists of taking a walk outside, picking a color to focus on, and following that color as you view your surroundings during your walk. Bennin and McMullan decided to take their walk around lower Manhattan on a Sunday afternoon and they noticed how following one color led them to notice another color and so on. The authors realized that by the end of their walk, the colors they noticed were still lingering in their minds. At the end of the article, the authors provide instructions on how to conduct your very own color walk: “ Give yourself an hour of uninterrupted time, no commutes, no errands, just eye time. Pick a color, or let a color pick you–follow the one that makes your heart go thump-thump. If you get lost, pick another color. If you get really lost, you’re on the right...

Reading Summary #6

Color Walking” “Color Walking”, is an article written by Phia Bennin and Brendan Mcmullan on June 29, 2012. In the beginning of the article, they talk about a tool dreamed up by Williams Burroughs to inspire his students. It involved the process of just walking out of the door, picking a color that catches your eye and while you walk just notice the objects that you come across with that same color; red bicyclist’s shorts, woman’s sunburned shoulders, and the paint on a fire hydrant. See simple enough right. They even decided to go a little further by using more than one color and letting your eyes bounce from object to object, color to color. They began their walk in WNYC, located in lower Manhattan. They started their walk out the revolving doors introducing their eyes to their first color, blue, which led them to a woman wearing a scarf, then a girl with chipped nail polish, which then almost led then on the subway but being distracted by the blues led them in another way, on the blue basketball courts. After being distracted by the blues and basketball, they started on their second color, somehow they set their eyes on purple and not long after pink, a purple shirt drew them in first, worn by someone with sparkly eyes, which led them to leopard legs and then leopard legs and “legalize gay”  at an outdoor café, a man in pink. This walk lasted them from 4:09p.m. to 4:23p.m. They talk about how they walked away from the experiment not only seeing the colors of the world but being...

Reading Summary #5

The article, Color Walking, by Phia Bennin and Brendan McMullan focuses on an interesting experiment that illuminates the world of color and how people see it, or more so how they do not see it. Color is a part of our daily lives and if we are not careful, we can become numb to it. Teacher William Burroughs created color walking. Burroughs first introduced color walking to his student as a way to inspire them (Bennin and McMullan, lines 3-4). This simple activity has ended up inspiring the authors of this article and many others by opening their eyes to the world of color. Color walking is simple: walk outside, pick a color, and follow that color by allowing your eyes to bounce from object to object (Bennin and McMullan, lines 5-7). On their advice on how to color walk, the authors note, “If you get lost, pick another color. If you get really lost, you’re on the right track” (Bennin and McMullan, line 22). In the article, readers follow the authors around the city of Manhattan as they feast their eyes upon the wonders of color: a blue scarf, blue at the basketball courts, a purple shirt, and hues of pink. The article provides photos and a timeline of their afternoon spent color walking (a screenshot of this is presented below). At the end of the experiment, the vividness and attention to color stayed in the minds of the authors, “We walked away seeing a world brimming over with colors” (Bennin and McMullan, lines 15-16). At the end of the article, advice is given on how readers can...
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