Some Summarizing Stuff: All [Internet] In Moderation.

  In the article Better Online Living Through Content Moderation by Melissa King, King argues that modes of controlling the ability for online content to reach certain individuals or an audience that could be potentially harmed by anxiety triggering digital content is extremely helpful and necessary for stopping the effects of abuse: “Content control is helpful in limiting the worst of these [cyber] attacks, which themselves can cause PTSD if severe or long-term enough. While using content control features is not guaranteed to stop the effects of abuse, they do help and their use should not be disparaged and discouraged” (King). King goes on to articulate and provides rebuttals to some of the arguments formed against her point of view on the matter, focusing three counter arguments: the Exposure Theory counter that some triggering web content seen by those with PTSD has the same effect as a psychological treatment process of showing triggering images or sounds to a patient with PTSD in a controlled environment to help the anxiety ridden patient rid of their anxiety: “Exposure Therapy is not about having random internet strangers hurl insults and threats at someone with the hope they somehow come out more mentally durable. Without controlled exposure, someone suffering from PTSD is likely to have their trauma magnified rather than reduced when faced with triggering content” (King). The second argument articulated by King is one where those blocked by massblocklists claim “defamation for statements and opinions that they did not make” (King). King replies that these claims cannot possibly hold up when blocklists make its filtration of content methodology clear and those blocked...
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