Annotated Bibliography

  Marling, Gitte, Ole B. Jensen, and Hans Kiib. “The Experience City: Planning of Hybrid Cultural Projects.” European Planning Studies 17.6 (2009): 863. Advanced Placement Source. Web. 4 Feb. 2016 This article revolves around a recent and current form of economy that is fueled by competition among regions: experience economy. This term symbolizes the idea of regions creating attractions for residents and tourists. The authors, through examples of Emscher Park, Barcelona, Graz, and Denmark, explain how several industrial or historic facilities get renovations in order to create a public place to appeal to either all crowds, or particular demographics, for “learning and playing” (869). Around the 1980s to 1990s, regions increasingly took interest into the image of spaces in order to demonstrate a high quality of living that would attract visitors and their money. With this, also, countries become increasingly diversified—if a region is competitive enough to accept strangers for the economic growth of the city. It is a common trend among people to seek leisure or new experiences, and that is why the market through an experience city is plenty successful. The article is easy to read, well organized, and reasonable in length. Through examples and analysis, the authors address a modern economy in architecture and how it effects, and is effected by, humanities.   Lees, Loretta. “The Geography of Gentrification: Thinking Through Comparative Urbanism.” Progress in Human Geography 36.2 (2012): 155. Advanced Placement Source. Web. 5 Feb. 2016 In this article, Lees presents a call-to-action for the awareness of global gentrification. The author criticizes the idea of urbanization which was given a positive connotation though the wealthy...

Black Gentrification

Barbara, Combs. “The Ties That Bind: The Role of Place in Racial Identity Formation, Social Cohesion, Accord, and Discord in Two Historic, Black Gentrifying Atlanta Neighborhoods.” SOCIOLOGY DISSERTATIONS(2010): 1–407. Print. Source: clatl.com In her dissertation Barbara Combs of Georgia State University, discusses the phenomenon of “black gentrification” in  Atlanta neighborhoods. She proposes that “black gentrification” is similar to mainstream gentrification, in exception that  “black gentrifying neighborhoods both the poor and working class residents who resided in the neighborhood prior to its gentrification and the new residents of greater economic means are black” (2). In this case it distinguishes from mainstream gentrification  because “black gentrifiers in black gentrifying neighborhoods often feel a responsibility or obligation to their lower income black neighbors” (2). Combs argues that “attachment to the neighborhood space …(place affinity ) has the potential to obviate social tensions in gentrifying black communities and bind residents to each other and the social space they all occupy” (3). She explores ways to ” strengthen social and economic cohesion in these gentrifying black communities” (3). Metro Atlanta neighborhoods faced economic decline due to the U.S. recession. The American Housing Rescue and Foreclosure Prevention Act of 2008 made funds available to refurbish homes that were vacated or foreclosed. However,  an “Atlanta Journal Constitution article appearing January 25, 2010, Federal officials say Atlanta is moving too slowly spending $12.3 million it got last March to buy vacant homes in neighborhoods ravaged by foreclosures (Stirgus 2010)” (20). Combs the gentrification taking place in the two Atlanta neighborhoods under study…against the findings of Larry Keating and the Gentrification Task Force Committee on Gentrification.” (23). Although whites are moving...

AB–6

Dupree, Nathalie, and Cynthia Graubart. “The Flying Biscuit.” Atlanta Magazine. Atlanta Magazine, 23 May 2011. Web. 03 Mar. 2016. Nathalie Dupree, a chef and the author of ‘New Southern Cooking,’ and Cynthia Graubart, also a chef and author, write this article to glorify the famous biscuits that come from The Flying Biscuit Café. They are qualified to write this article because both of these women have went to culinary school and studied southern cooking and went as far as writing books on the topic. The used the recipe of the famous biscuits and experience in this article. The authors’ purpose was to give instruction on how to make the biscuits and to inform readers of how good they are. “The Flying Biscuit Cafe is reputed to have the best biscuit in Atlanta.” The readers of Atlanta magazine are the intended audience. People who are looking to make these biscuits and want to know a little more about the café and what has made it so popular. “They churn them out day after day, and moans of pleasure can be heard out on the street by the lines of young and old waiting for a seat.” This source is useful because it reflects on the biscuits that made this café important to Atlanta. The interior has been seen as unique and a home feel to it, along with the smell of the...
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