interior, Exterior & Digital Analysis

  Digital 1 AJC.com   This is the homepage for The Atlanta Journal Constitution. In the top left corner reads “AJC.com.” The typeface for the letters AJC is the same typeface used in the weekly printed newspaper. The adoption of the acronym logo means they are trying to appeal to an evolving audience. The physical paper typically reads The Atlanta Journal Constitution full out. The layout of the website is as simple as the physical newspaper to appeal to the same readers. There are tabs that reflect the sections of the physical newspaper: News, Sports, Entertainment etc. The logo is blue and white and the tabs for the sections are written in black with a colored bullet. This layout takes on a more serious tone than website for publications like Cosmopolitan or Harper’s Bazaar. Yet, the website design and typefaces appeal to the new-industrial feel of the city it caters to.   This page reads “The page could not be found.” This happened several times as I clicked through some of the posts from 2013 and older. I was trying to see how long the AJC has been digital. There were I know this is something that can be easily fixed but I’m not sure what it will take to get someone to restore these archives to the website. In concession to the previous picture of a page not found, I did find this story about  the Atlanta teachers cheating scandal when it was just a conspiracy. This digital platform also acts as an archive. Instead of going to the library, flipping through dusty old newspapers for information, you...

annotated bib

eDavis, Joeff “The Herndon Homes demolition off of Northside Drive.” 2011. Creative Loafing   This is a picture of the demolished Herdon Homes housing project. It was taken in 2010 and demonstrates just how recent this neighborhood has been gentrified. Since I am arguing both sides of gentrification, this picture provides a neutral visual.   Readers may feel saddened by the homes being torn down or they may see this as a step towards new industrialism for Old Fourth Ward. I don’t think the picture alone provides bias but the article it accompanied was not in favor of the public housing’s demise. The picture does provide perspective.   http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/11/national/11atlanta.html?_r=2&   This is an article focusing on black displacement in Atlanta. It was published by The New York Times in 2006 which was the decade where gentrification in Atlanta jumped to the highest,   Gentrification of the City by Neil Smith   This book discusses Gentrification . It was written in 1986, pre-gentrification leap, . Smith talks about the fears of gentrification and juxtaposes them with the way things work in the world.   The New Urban Frontier: Gentrification and the Revanchist City By Neil Smith   This article essentially looks at large cities, like Atlanta,  as a “new frontier”, suggesting that gentrification is a part of evolution. I chose to cite this article because there are new additions to Old FOurth Ward that are bringing in revenue for the city. This was written in the 80s and I could compare the things Smith said to what is going on in O4W today.   Faulkner, Sherah, “It Makes Atlanta Feel...

When Fourth Ward Grew Old: A discussion on gentrification focusing on one of Atlanta’s most famous historic neighborhoods.

  When discussing gentrification, historically, it holds a negative connotation– wealthy white people move into an urban area and low income residents are relocated and forgotten. This is the most common idea that reign. In a recent conversation with my mother on where hanging out with my boyfriend in the. It hit me, Old Fourth Ward wasn’t always Old. The Fourth Ward my mother once lived in is not the same as the Old Fourth Ward that my boyfriend lives in. The demographics of Atlanta have changed in the last five years. According to Creative Loafing, Atlanta was named one of the top 10 cities where gentrification is growing the fastest in 2015. The last census showed a 12% dip in the black population in Atlanta. Atlanta neighborhood Fourth Ward was home of Dr. Martin Luther King and was once an elegant black neighborhood. Today, Old Fourth Ward is less than percent black and pieces if it’s black history lie in its shadows. ess than __   Much of the change to the look of Old Fourth Ward was orchestrated by Gravel and The Atlanta BeltLine Redevelopment Plan. Adopted in 2005, the municipal For most of the 20th century, Atlanta was known for its public housing. The very housing projects that were built to aid low income communities have since been demolished. Herdon homes off Northside drive, was demolished in 2010. [picture]w However, most Mayors would see such revitalization as an accomplishment. In the neighbirhood revitalization process, maybe we should look at -What kinds of neighborhoods do we want to create? How do we preserve and expand affordable housing?...

Interior Built Environment Analysis- Peachtree City Station

[signs picture no.1] Peachtree Center Station is located under Peachtree Road. There are two exits for patrons to use on either side of Peachtree of the station. There are signs inside that point to America’s Mart, World of Coke, the library and other businesses and attractions in the area. These signs suggest this rail station was made with business workers, students and tourists in mind.   Picture of the walls at train station The signs in the station are in the same typeface and colors as the rest of the rail stations. However, the walls at this stop are designed with jagged stones to resemble a raw underground tunnel. This design shows the history of the building of this station without saying anything. Unlike the subway in New York, most of MARTA’s train routes run above ground. Workers had to dig deep under Peachtree St. to get a train operating down there.   Escalator at Peachtree City Station Photo by Joeff Davis This is the escalator on the South side of the station. According to Creative Loafing, the escalator at the south entrance of Peachtree Center Station is the longest escalator in the Southeast. There are few elevators making the escalators the quickest route down. These escalators exclude disabled bodies. The deep incline of the escalator makes some patrons feel sick. This entrance is the first one I come to when I leave campus and I used to get freaked out by the escalators, but I can handle it now. I know how deep the train is underground and I know the escalators are necessary.   I searched “Peachtree...

Architectural Exclusion

In the article “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment,”  Sarah Schindler discusses segregation that extends past laws and social norms to the built environment. Schindler explores social norms It looks at architecture and infrastructure of cities like Atlanta being used to further segregation. Schindler Instead of the very obvious laws that segregated the blacks from the whites and sometimes the rich from the poor, Schindler discusses A large number of the poor population rely on public transportation like buses, rail lines and walking. Schindler mentions that residents of suburban Atlantan communities reject the expansion of Atlanta’s MARTA rail station. Expansion of the rail service will ultimately allow blacks into their perfectly segregated communities. Schindler argues that because public transportation destinations are so limited, blacks and low-income individuals are still facing unemployment. Schindler reports In an example of segregation by infrastructure, Schindler writes about Robert Moses’s bridges in Long Island. Moses deliberately made it to where these bridges hang so low that large buses could not pass. So not only do communities reject public transportation expansion, there were actual bridges built to keep low-income individuals out of public spaces. Furthermore, SChindler writes about Detroit’s infamous Eight Mile Wall which was constructed to separate a black neighborhood from a white one. Schindler also notes that some communities decide to not adopt sidewalks in order to make travel by foot difficult. Schindler argues that such obvious inequalities have been overlooked by judges because they bring in money. The judges benefit from this Ultimately allowing the privileged community to grow and thrive. Schindler notes that even The...
css.php