American Dreamer

American Dreamer Dreamer remains hopeful for naturalization against all odds. Villafana’s DACA Paperwork The typical American high school senior is one that is well rounded. They participate extracurricular activities. They tailgate on Fridays. They are hardworking, active in their school and socially advanced. And when the time comes, they apply for higher education. Emilio Villafana was one of those American high school seniors, until he found out he wasn’t. “I thought I was an American until high school came around and my friends started getting jobs and licenses. I didn’t have a Social Security card or a birth certificate or anything that would allow me to get these things. That’s when I started to see a tangible difference between me and everyone else,” Villafana said. Villafana was born in Trinidad and Tobago and moved to the United States when he was one years old. Student visas allowed his parents entry to the U.S. Their visas expired but they decided to stay in the U.S. to give Villafana and their family a better life. “I’ve never known Trinidad. I left when I was a baby. I only know America, I have an American perspective on the world,” Villafana said. He grew up like a regular American kid. He participated in sports and attended the American school system from kindergarten. When he could not obtain a driver’s license in high school he could not obtain a driver’s license after realizing he did not own a social security card. In his search to obtain one, it finally sinked in that he was in fact not a documented American citizen. When the time...
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