Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment. Summary

The article “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment” by Sarah Schindler, shows us how some cities are built and conducted to promote segregation and discrimination. It also gives us information on a few cities that are predominantly African American and how this architectural exclusion affects the people there. It also goes on to show how these cases dodged the supreme court’s eye leading them to not challenge any of the issues. As you read through the article you learn more about how this exclusion takes place throughout the history of our country. In Atlanta, Georgia the use of MARTA does not travel into the northern suburban communities due to the face that, “wealthy, mostly white residents of the northern Atlanta suburbs have vocally opposed efforts to expand MARTA into their neighborhoods for the reason that doing so would give people of color easy access to suburban communities”(Schindler). In 1974 in  Memphis, Tennessee a whole street was closed off because it connected a predominately white neighborhood to a primary black neighborhood, because the “cause” was to promote safety and reduce traffic and noise within their community. This caught the attention of Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and he thought that this carried a “powerful symbolic message.” The Supreme Court just saw these instances as normal and innocent efforts for advancement and building cities; but it actually was using design tactics to separate the, less fortunate, African Americans (and other minorities). And since the designs are viewed as common city, and community, enhancements, it was easy to slip right from under the eyes of the...

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